Search results for: heater

Greenhouse Heaters – Which One Is Right For You?

Greenhouse HeaterGreenhouse heaters. Electric, natural gas, propane and many more. But which heater is right for your greenhouse? How do you find out? This is where BTU’s (British thermal units) come in. To find the best heater for your greenhouse you must know the number of BTU’s required. And I am going to show you how to determine it!

Here are a few simple steps to find your BTU requirement.

 

  • STEP 1

You need to know the surface area of your greenhouse. This is not simply multiplying the length and width. You must calculate the area of each wall and each ceiling panel then add them all together. If you have a Sunglo greenhouse click here for Sunglo’s Surface Area Guide post.

  • STEP 2

Next you need to find out the average winter temperature (outside) in your area. This is where the internet comes in handy. But I made it easy for you > Click here to view a list of average temperatures in the U.S.

  • STEP 3

Now what temperature do you want to keep your greenhouse at in the winter? This depends on the plants you are growing. You should be able to find plant temperatures online. But a common minimum temperature for over wintering is 50°F.

  • STEP 4

The next step is finding your greenhouse’s U-Value or Heat Transfer Coefficient. This is determined by the material your greenhouse is made of. For a Sunglo greenhouse we use a U-Value of 0.75. To find your specific materials U-Value > Click here for a general list.

  •  STEP 5

Now that you have completed the first 4 steps you should have –

  1. Your greenhouse surface area
  2. Average winter temperature
  3. Desired greenhouse temperature for the winter months
  4. Your greenhouse material U-Value

Now we can find our required BTU’s!

And here is the formula –

  • Desired greenhouse winter temp – Average winter temp outside  = Temp differential
  • Surface area × temp differential × U-Value = Required BTU

For example:

My greenhouse surface area is 744

My average winter temp is 20°F

Desired greenhouse winter temp is 50°F

Sunglo acrylic U-Value is 0.75

  • 50° − 20° = 30° (Temp differential)
  • 744 (surface area) × 30 (temp differential) × 0.75 (U-value) = 16,740 BTU’s

Now you can shop for a heater that provides at least 16,740 BTU’s!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DIY Greenhouse Shades

Pretty Burlap Greenhouse Shades

Post author: Heidi at mysweetcottage.com

 

I still love the Sunglo greenhouse that my husband, Chris, assembled last fall.

Burlap greenhouse shades

Greenhouse in December, 2014, shortly after assembly of the exterior.

And, since I’m new to greenhouse gardening in general, I’m still learning new things about it.

Too Much of a Good Thing

Because of the excellent south-facing location we chose for the greenhouse and the early spring we’ve been having this year, the fan in the greenhouse has been working overtime.  The plants and seeds I started inside have been getting a little too much of some good things – namely heat and sun.

My darling greenhouse is just doing what it’s supposed to do, and it came with a shade cloth for the exterior that we realized we should install pronto for just these kinds of conditions.

A Lighter Shade of . . . Shade

Maybe I was just being naïve, but it seemed to me to be a little early in the year to install the shade cloth.  In the Pacific Northwest, the weather can turn on a dime, and we might still be faced with days of clouds, rain, and general gloominess.

So I started thinking about ways to get some light-duty shade.  Something I could install on the inside of the greenhouse that would allow filtered light and bring the temperature down just a few degrees.

At the fabric store, I ran across that good old standby, burlap.  And burlap is sometimes used in orchards and plantations to shade crops but still provide filtered light.  Perfect.

I chose this soft, pretty burlap.

burlap greenhouse shades

Shading on the Curve

So now we had a new challenge:  How to turn the burlap into shades that would curve with the wall of the greenhouse.

burlap greenhouse shades

Greenhouse before shades

I decided I would leave the ceiling of the greenhouse un-shaded since most of the sunlight comes in from the south-facing wall.  So I would shade the curved wall down to the upper shelf.  That way, plants that needed it could be placed on the lower shelf and still get direct sunlight.

But how to make a shade fit the curve.  At first I thought we (and by “we,” I mean Chris) could install an upper rod to suspend the shades, and then a second rod farther down on the curve.  The shades would then be tucked behind the second rod so they would follow the line of the curve.

But we both hated the thought of drilling a lot of big holes and….

To view this full post you can read it on Heidi’s blog here.

 

1700C – 8×10 Lean-To Greenhouse Review

Greenhouse Review – Redmond, WA.

1700 Lean-to greenhouse
1700C – 8×10 Lean-to Sunglo Greenhouse – Attached to customer’s house on deck foundation

Hi Sunglo,

greenhouse review
1700C Lean-to Sunglo greenhouse

Thank you for making such a great greenhouse.  We chose the 1700-C lean-to, and it turned out to be a perfect fit on our deck.

We installed it around a kitchen door and can walk straight into the greenhouse without going outside.

greenhouse view
1700C Lean-to Sunglo greenhouse

It’s tall enough for us to walk around comfortably (I’m 6’1”), and wide and deep enough for several large shelves of flowers and room to work.

We’ve even brought in a couple chairs and table so we can hang out with the bonsais and orchids.

greenhouse review
1700C Lean-to Sunglo greenhouse – Interior

It was pretty spectacular to sit out there in a thunder storm with heavy wind, rain and lightning.  The greenhouse was water-tight and didn’t budge.

Greenhouse review
110V power panel with heating/cooling thermostat and outlet

The heater, fan and automatic shutter are hooked up now, and as you described the greenhouse is like a living thing, heating and cooling when it chooses.

We had read in reviews that some greenhouse kits had issues with rattling and weak frames.  We chose Sunglo because we had read your greenhouses were much stronger and in a class by themselves.

greenhouse review
Sunglo greenhouses acrylic panels and aluminum framework

After watching our greenhouse come together, I now know why.  Those rivets and aluminum frame are clearly inspired by aircraft design, and the final result is as tight and solid as an air-frame.

There is no rattling, and nothing moves even when you push hard against the frame.

We are very happy with our greenhouse and would recommend it to anyone.

1700 Lean-to greenhouse
1700C Lean-to Sunglo greenhouse

Thanks so much for making it and for your help getting it up and running.

 

Ron & Bertie

Redmond, WA.

To view this complete project click here.

To learn more about Sunglo’s 1700 lean-to series click here.

Read another customer review here.

Questions? Call us @ 800-647-0606

greenhouse ventilation

Greenhouse Ventilation

Greenhouse Ventilation 

Vents VS Exhaust/Shutter System

greenhouse ventilation

There are many factors to consider when greenhouse shopping; Insulation, glazing material, space, foundation, heat and of course greenhouse ventilation. And if you are planning on growing year round you want to make sure to choose the most energy efficient structure because heating in the cooler months can be expensive – This is where great insulation can reduce energy costs.

greenhouse ventilation
Example of roof vent
Greenhouse ventilation
Example of roll up sides

Manual or automatic roof vents have their advantages and disadvantages. If the greenhouse is designed very well then aerodynamics have been considered and the roof vents will be placed in the perfect position for wind to pull air out while still circulating air through the greenhouse. Placement of the greenhouse is also very important for wind to catch on the ridge of the greenhouse and create a vacuum type air movement. A large circulation fan or multiple fans will be required in the interior of the greenhouse and will aid in fresh air exchange. Some larger or commercial greenhouses offer a roll up design that allows for the sides of the greenhouse to be completely open to the outside. Now, if you are concerned about pests this might not be the best option for you because generally with open air vents many of them are needed and screening them can be difficult, if not impossible. Maintenance can give you trouble as well. If you do not have the time to go open the manual vents, do not have the ability to climb a ladder for high roof vents, or have limited budget for automatic vents then an alternative option should be considered. For a very small/beginner greenhouse or a small lean-to style with a low insulation value these type of vents are appropriate. The higher the insulation value of the greenhouse glazing material the stronger ventilation you will need.

 

greenhouse ventilation
220V power panel

Thermostatically controlled ventilation is very popular and with supplemental air circulation can be most efficient. Sunglo uses exhausts fans and motorized intake shutters controlled by a thermostat with the option to hook up to a heater as well; we call them power panels and include other electrical items too. So if you prefer your greenhouse to remain between 50° and 75° all you have to do is set the thermostats for the ventilation and heater to turn on and off automatically. The exhaust fan and shutter are synchronized to open at the same time. The motorized shutter opens to allow fresh cool air into the greenhouse while the exhaust fan starts to spin and expel the used hot air that has risen inside the greenhouse. Sunglo’s basic system is rated to exchange fresh air throughout the greenhouse once per minute; providing you with a system that cools rapidly. The basic system is included with every Sunglo greenhouse. The exhaust fan(s) are placed as high as possible on one end of the greenhouse and the

greenhouse ventilation
Schaefer exhaust fan and shutter
Greenhouse ventilation - Automatic opener
Automatic vent opener for Sunglo vent

shutter(s) are placed as low as possible on the opposite end. This allows for the best possible circulation throughout the entire greenhouse. There are many brands to choose from but either aluminum, steel, poly or fiberglass options are available each with different pros, cons, sizes and pricing. We include poly exhaust fans and shutters with our greenhouses but any type is available for upgrade. Automatic vent openers are available for the gable end manual vents on our greenhouses and will increase air circulation as well. They do not use any electricity. These automatic openers are controlled by a wax piston. By twisting the piston left or right sets the degree to which it opens. These automatic openers are specially important in areas where the climate stays consistently at or over 80 degrees. By setting up a circulation fan inside the greenhouse and setting the automatic openers to open before the ventilation system starts will save you electricity usage. Sunglo also offers a variety of atmospheric controls. If you would like to view some of the ventilation products Sunglo offers please visit the Schaefer website or give us a call with your inquiry.

 

greenhouse ventilation
Sunglo greenhouse – Front with intake shutter and back with exhaust fan

Learn more about summer climate control here.

If you are interested in adding ventilation to your greenhouse or would like to discuss options or have questions about anything please give us a call at 425-251-8005 or e-mail to info@sunglogreenhouses.com.

Guest Article: Starting Begonias in a Greenhouse

 

 How to Start Tuberous Begonias in the Greenhouse

Tuberous begonias are one of my favorite summertime flowers. Striking in containers and hanging baskets, if treated right they give color all summer and into fall. These big beauties bloom in many colors and are not to be confused with the smaller wax begonias you will see later in the season sold in pony packs. The showy tuberous begonia makes a big impact.

Since tuberous begonias can be started indoors in early spring, I decided to give my begonias a jump start in my greenhouse – Starting begonias in a greenhouse.

  • Choosing Good Tubers

Right around now, begonia tubers are available at home and garden centers,usually in packages of three tubers that look like this.

Healthy tubers
Packages of begonia tubers

Starting out with healthy tubers is very important. While at the garden center, I try to examine the tubers in the package as best I can. I look past the wood chips to determine if the tubers are healthy. I look for plump, firm tubers. If a tuber feels mushy when squeezed, that means it’s starting to rot. I also look for any sign of emerging stems on the concave side of the tuber.

Starting begonias in a greenhouse
Healthy tubers

They usually appear at first as tiny red or pink bumps and then they start to bud out. So in this case, red or pink bumps are a good thing as this means the tuber is viable.

 

 

  •  Starting the Tubers in the Greenhouse

I planted the tubers in square 5-inch plastic pots that drain. I used a 50/50 blend of seedling starter mix and regular potting soil and moistened it slightly before filling the containers.

I filled each container with soil until it was about two to three inches short of the top and then placed the tuber in the middle with the root side down and the side with the emerging stems (pink bumps) up. I pushed the tuber down into the soil but didn’t completely submerge it.

Starting begonias in a greenhouse
Pink/red stems facing up
Starting begonias in a greenhouse
Planted

Then I covered the tubers with a dusting of soil. I watered around (but not on top of) the tuber to moisten the soil. During the tuber’s time in the greenhouse, it’s important to keep the soil moist but not soggy. And since tubers can rot fairly easily, it’s also important not to have standing water on top of the tuber. So in short, water around it, not on top of it. In addition to evenly moist soil, they need lots of bright light, so my grow light will also come in handy.
Once the stems sprout a bit, I will fill more soil in on top of the tuber so that the roots can better develop. Another option at this point is to replant the tuber deeper into the soil.

 

  • Going Outside

When the danger of frost has passed and evening temperatures stay above 50⁰F, I can replant the begonias into containers or hanging baskets and place them outside in partial shade. They should be kept evenly moist (but not soggy) throughout the summer and fertilized occasionally. I’m looking forward to the show.

Starting begonias in a greenhouse
About our guest writer:  Heidi lives in the Seattle area with her husband, Chris. In the fall of 2014, they became the proud owners of their own Sunglo greenhouse. Read about their experiences with their greenhouse and their other home and garden projects on Heidi’s blog, My Sweet Cottage.

If you have a Sunglo greenhouse and would like to share your experiences, submit an article to info@sunglogreenhouses.com. From greenhouse gardening to replacing a panel on your greenhouse etc. – 4 paragraph minimum. Please include pictures.

Sunglo Greenhouse Tips

LogoSungloNew

Thank you for purchasing your Sunglo greenhouse!

Sunglo Greenhouse Tips

Now that your greenhouse is built here are a few things to help you get started-

• Have a certified electrician connect your electricity for the ventilation system, power panel and other electrical components.
• Once electrical has been connected, set your ventilation thermostat and heating thermostat at your desired temperatures.

  • Example of power panel placement (220V shown): Place the panel in a location where it is least likely to be exposed to water.

Sunglo greenhouse tips - Power panel

 

• Hook up your lights! They can be hung from the trusses for overhead lighting.

  • Example of light placement: You can drill holes through the roof trusses, place an S-hook through the holes, and hang lights and baskets from the hooks.

Sunglo greenhouse tips - Lights
• Install your shade cloth if the temperature is hot outside. We suggest purchasing 6+ bungee cords and the same amount of eyelet hooks to install your shade cloth.

  • Example of shade cloth on free-standing model: The wooden foundation is perfect to hold the eyelet hooks. For larger greenhouse you can use a long rope at the corners for easy installation and removal.

Sunglo greenhouse tips - Shade cloth

 

• Cleaning your greenhouse-

  • We suggest cleaning the greenhouse twice a year with 1/3 cup of bleach per gallon of warm water. Using a long handled mop scrub the outside and inside of the greenhouse. Environmentally safe cleaning products can be used as well.

• Visit the Sunglo blog for information about saving energy, shade cloths, additional accessories and about greenhouse growing.
• If you haven’t already, we suggest investing in a good greenhouse growing book like “The Greenhouse Expert” By Dr. D.G. Hessayon. This will provide you with information on different plants that thrive in your greenhouse atmosphere and additional information about grow lights, plant nutrients, temperature and moisture control, etc.

• Now that you have the major things sorted out check out our “Greenhouse Gardening Basics” post to keep you moving forward!
• Find Sunglo on social media for new product alerts, company news and greenhouse growing information-

Sunglo provides for each greenhouse a manual, foundation guide, power panel wiring diagram, cedar shelf instructions, product/parts catalog and other information. Contact customer service if you would like to request any additional information.

Please do not hesitate to contact Sunglo’s customer service or technical team for any questions you may have. Call 425-251-8005 or e-mail info@sunglogreenhouses.com.

If you have any “Sunglo greenhouse tips” you would like to share please let us know!

Sunglo Greenhouses is located just outside Seattle, WA. // 425-251-8005
// info@sunglogreenhouses.com

greenhouse gardening basics

Greenhouse Gardening Basics

Greenhouse Gardening – The Basics

A few basic items that we recommend you start off with and some words of encouragement!

 

The time has finally come. After all the hours of researching, sifting through greenhouse blogs and forums, having those off and on feelings about making the decision and debating whether or not you have the time and energy to even use one; You have purchased your own greenhouse! And frankly it should be one of the best decisions you made! Greenhouse’s not only give you a space to grow and overwinter plants but the enrichment gardening brings to people’s lives is incredible. And let’s not down play the fact that you will save a few bucks too! But once you have made it through the pain and hectic-ness of finding your perfect greenhouse, building the foundation, greenhouse assembly and the spendy electrician… where do you start? Greenhouse gardening is not as scary as it looks. The greenhouse itself will do a lot of the work for you. Light, air circulation, heat and controls are provided for you. Sunglo’s packages include lighting, ventilation system (for air circulation), heater, controls, etc. – To make life easier on you. Once these have been electrically hooked up you can focus on the fun stuff!

I am a beginner gardener myself and I started off with a small lean-to greenhouse but had no idea where to start! Luckily I had some help and now can say I have an ity bity tiny amount of experience under my belt!

If you own a Sunglo greenhouse you should either have the built in benches and shelves or purchased your own bench system. Obviously this design depends on the type of plants and amount of plants you intend to grow. But adequate space for pots and thingy majigs will make life easier.

 

Here is a list of items I suggest you purchase to start off-

  1. A large bag of soil – Go with a brand that will feed the plants for 90+ days and is suitable for indoor/outdoor gardening. (If you have good compost in your garden already, a special fine seed starter soil without the nutrients might be best.)

 

  1. Seeds! – Choose 3-5 packets to start with and make sure they are appropriate for the season. I would suggest some flowers and tomatoes. Also, read the back of the packet. Seed packets have a great deal of info on the back and the difference between needing full sun and partial shade etc. may sway your decisions.

 

  1. Plants – You want your greenhouse to feel like a garden, so choose a few pretty, green, grown plants to stick in the corners or pull them from the plants you already own. I like cacti and succulents. They are easy to care for and look great! Don’t forget to grab a few pretty pots to transfer them into. The book “The Greenhouse Expert” by Dr. D.G. Hessayon is very useful and provides detailed information on greenhouse plants. I would pick up this book immediately!

 

  1. Little things – Grab a few seed trays (You know the black trays with 50+ squares), you’ll want a small and a large water can, a few 5 gallon buckets for plant scraps, a small circulation fan (unless you have one from Sunglo already), work gloves (get 2 pairs JIC!), hand trowel (small garden shovel), and take a look through all the goodies in your local nursery or garden store. There are always fun things you can pick up!

 

It really depends on the plants you will be growing to determine what kinds of accessories you will want. Eventually you might want to upgrade your atmospheric controls or install some extra shelving. Greenhouses are so fun and customizable. Follow your heart! And remember you can always change things around. Nothing is permanent.

 

The main things to remember are light, temperature and water. As long as you give your plants adequate light, keep the desired temperature and water your plants to their specific needs you should have no problems! – OK you might run into a few along the way! I won’t lie to you! But those things are for later on. Enjoy your greenhouse! Experiment with different plants and flowers. Find your passion and relax in your own paradise! That is what a greenhouse is all about. Fulfilling your passion and creating your own oasis.

 

Need help? You can always contact us at Sunglo for any questions about your greenhouse or growing. And Visit us on Facebook to see what other customers have done to their greenhouses and what they have growing!

Greenhouse Foundations

greenhouse foundations
2100 model with 3 foot raised foundation/knee wall

 

Greenhouse foundations

Purchasing a greenhouse can be a difficult and sometimes overwhelming process. The first factors you should consider are location, foundation and of course your budget. All foundations should be level and square. A square and level foundation will eliminate challenges later when installing your greenhouse. A raised foundation or knee wall is a good option if you prefer to add height to your greenhouse. Knee walls are commonly 12-48 inches high and can be made of various materials. If you would like a knee wall with your Sunglo greenhouse kit please notify us at 800-647-0606 to add a door drop kit to your order.

Concrete

Concrete is a great option for a greenhouse foundation and often chosen among consumers because is it convenient. To attach your greenhouse to a concrete base we recommend attaching quality treated wood to the base of the greenhouse, commonly called a wood sill plate. 2 x 4’s will do. If you choose to use pressure treated wood make sure to install a barrier between the wood and aluminum, such as gasket material, as the treated wood can cause the aluminum to rust. Sunglo includes a barrier called a “boot” with each greenhouse kit.

greenhouse foundations
Concrete foundation – Raised/knee wall

Measure twice before cutting your wood to ensure proper dimensions. We suggest allowing a 1” border around the inside and outside of the entire greenhouse. Sunglo adds 2″ to each greenhouse size for the foundation measurements.

This is designed to allow a safe margin for irregularities in the wood sill plate. After the concrete has been poured and is level and square, a small drain should be placed in the center of the slab where water run off can drain into a gravel pit or piping that leads to a drainage area. Then your greenhouse can be bolted to the foundation.  Water and electricity should be ran to the greenhouse site before the foundation is built.

Wood

Inside a 1200G Sunglo greenhouse
1200 series Sunglo greenhouse with a raised wooden foundation and custom benches

Building a wood base is easy and inexpensive. Cedar and redwood are commonly used. Pressure treated wood is also a great option but make sure to put a barrier between the wood and aluminum, such as gasket material, as the treated wood can cause the aluminum to rust. The size of your base will depend on the size of your greenhouse again allowing a 1” border around the inside and outside of the greenhouse. After assembling the base and making sure your ground is level lay down a weed barrier. This allows the water to drain through but does not allow weeds to come up through the floor boards.

1000E Sunglo greenhouse
1000E Sunglo greenhouse built on a wooden foundation

Pack the natural earth over the excess barrier. After your base is finished and the weed barrier is set underneath, you need to cover it. Start laying down your wood planks to make the floor. Now it’s time to attach the greenhouse frame to the base – Make sure it is level and square again by measuring from corner to corner.  For added insulation, we suggest you caulk the bottom of the aluminum framing (caulk the wood then attach the frame – making sure there is a barrier between the aluminum and wood)  where it meets the base with a waterproof sealant – If you are using pressure treated it is still a good idea to caulk between the base and wood. This will add extra protection to the greenhouse and keep cold air from entering and warm air from escaping in the colder months. If you are using pressure treated wood make sure the aluminum does not come into direct contact. Sunglo includes a plastic “boot” that attaches to the base rails with all our kits, so you don’t have to worry! As with all foundations please consider whether you will need water and electricity ran to the greenhouse site. Wood foundations are natural and beautiful looking! The only down side is you might have to replace the wood every 8-10 years.

Deck

If you are planning on purchasing a lean-to style greenhouse or even a small free-standing but only have room on your deck, that’s no problem!  Before attaching the greenhouse base to pressure treated wood lay down a thick rubber, insulated mat that is the dimension of the floor of your greenhouse.

greenhouse foundations
1700 lean-to model on deck

There are various mats you can purchase that have designs or just plain old black. Insulating underneath and around the base is a good idea also. To attach the greenhouse base to the deck we recommend contacting your hardware store representative and explaining the project. Decks are made of different materials and you wouldn’t want to ruin your deck in the process. Now insulation will be an issue as well. Depending on your style of deck please take this into consideration and do your research on what type of insulation, if any, you should use. Water and electricity can be easily ran to a greenhouse on a deck foundation as it is usually attached to a house or a building.

There is lots of info on the web about different foundations and step by step instructions on how to build them. I hope this gave you an idea of what you want to do with your foundation!

NOTE: If you choose to create a foundation that is NOT concrete we highly recommend giving the wood base a few days to settle. After 24 hours re-measure for square and level. In some cases the foundation will settle and become uneven affecting the assembly of the greenhouse. And you dont want that to happen because it can make installation very difficult!

Sunglo offers a greenhouse foundations guide that shows how to build a easy, affordable and effective foundation base. To request a free-standing or lean-to foundation guide call us at 800-647-0606.

To view a large gallery of pictures visit our Facebook albums page.

 For more advice about greenhouse foundations or general questions leave a comment below or please e-mail us at info@sunglogreenhouses.com or call us at 1-800-647-0606.

Energy saving tips – In your greenhouse

Here are a few energy saving tips:

Energy Saving Tips

Reduce air leakage from the greenhouse –

Small cracks and loose glazing materials can cause unwanted air to enter or escape from your greenhouse. Obviously both will affect the efficiency of any heating system you have in place. But fixing areas around the doors and vents that are not air tight can help stop unwanted air flow. Caulking holes or lining parts of the frame and weather stripping around the door can make a big difference. Shutting your fans off during the winter and covering them with a thick plastic will help keep your greenhouse regulated in the winter months. And always fix any holes or broken panels as soon as possible. If you have a Sunglo you can call 1-800-647-0606 for any replacement parts!

Use a double layer glazing system –

Double layered glazing material can be beneficial, if it is done the correct way. Our greenhouses have an inner corrugated panel that creates a 1.5” dead air space keeping it exceptionally insulated. To see how Sunglo’s unique glazing system works click here.

Install windbreaks –

Windbreaks are important in high wind areas because it prevents the cold wind from hitting the greenhouse therefore cooling it down. Building a mini fence or even planting shrubbery around the base of your greenhouse is effective. Some gardener’s plant small trees around their greenhouse, it not only looks pretty but will help keep the wind at bay. Whatever you decide to use make sure it stands mid-level to your greenhouse so it doesn’t block the sun. If you already have some tree cover in your yard or near the greenhouse than your in luck! No planting for you!

Use a shade cloth –

Shade cloths are wonderful for high temperature areas. They are used during the hottest time of the day to reduce thermal solar radiation. Sunglo carries a wide variety of sizes and they can be mixed and matched to perfectly fit your greenhouse. For more information on shade cloths click here.

Use your heat wisely –

To calculate what type of heater you’ll need for your greenhouse there is a simple formula. Take the temperature you want the greenhouse to stay at (let’s say 50) and the average winter temperature in your area (how about 20) and subtract them (equals 30). Next you multiply the temperature difference by the surface area of your greenhouse (8×10 greenhouse is 276 X 30 = 8280). Now you multiply your answer by your greenhouse materials U value. For a Sunglo you would multiply 8280 X .75 = 6210 BTU’s(.75 is Sunglo’s U value). This means you need to find a heater that has exactly or over 6210 BTU’s to efficiently heat your greenhouse. Using the correct heater will ensure thriving plants and not use unwanted electricity. To see this formula again and more in depth information on BTU requirements check out this post. Click here.

For more information on saving energy visit PSE.com

Sunglo Surface Area Guide

Sunglo Greenhouses Surface Areas-

This post is a supplement of a previous post for determining the heating or BTU requirements of your greenhouse – Click here to read the Greenhouse Heating post.

The following are approximate surface area’s of each Sunglo greenhouse series.

1000 Series - Surface Area

  • 1000 Series – 7′ 9″ Width

Model                Surface Area

7.5ft – B                     228

10ft – C                      276

12.5ft – D                   324

15ft – E                      372

17.5ft – F                   420

For every 2.5ft after model 1000F add 48 to the surface area.

1200 Series - Surface Area

  •  1200 Series – 10′ 3″ Width

Model                Surface Area

10ft – C                       338

12.5ft – D                    392

15ft – E                       446

17.5ft – F                    500

20ft – G                       554

For every 2.5ft after model 1200G add 54 to the surface area.

2100 Series - Surface Area

  • 2100 Series – 15′ 3″ Width

Model                Surface Area

10ft – C                     484

12.5ft – D                  549

15ft – E                     614

17.5ft – F                  679

20ft – G                    744

For every 2.5ft after model 2100G add 65 to the surface area.

1500 Series - Surface Area

  • 1500 Lean-To Series – 5′ 1.5″ Width

Model               Surface Area

10ft – C                    169

12.5ft – D                 196

15ft – E                     223

17.5ft – F                  250

20ft – G                    277

For every 2.5ft after model 1500G add 27 to the surface area.

1700 Series - SUrface Area

  • 1700 Lean-To Series – 7′ 7.5″ Width

Model                Surface Area

10ft – C                    242

12.5ft – D                 275

15ft – E                    307

17.5ft – F                 340

20ft – G                    372

For every 2.5ft after model 1700G add 33 to the surface area.

If you are a customer with a custom style Sunglo or have a discontinued series or just have questions please give us a call at 1-800-647-0606.