Category: Greenhouse Uses

Greenhouse Growing – Tomatoes

 

Greenhouse growing tomatoes
Greenhouse Tomatoes

Greenhouse Growing Tomatoes:

Greenhouse growing can be intimidating. Considering all of the factors like light, heat, ventilation, controls, etc. and how to incorporate them perfectly together to create the optimum gardening environment may seem like a daunting task. But if you choose the right greenhouse brand and do a little research you’ll come to realize that it’s easier then it sounds. Here’s a history lesson of my gardening experience; I have been working for Sunglo for almost 3 years now and before I started working for this wonderful company I had very little growing experience and no greenhouse knowledge what so ever. I grew up working at my aunts nursery watering, and moving plants from greenhouse to greenhouse. I never grew any plants myself or even really thought about it. And I was never aware of  how complex the environment was. Like how the cactus greenhouse stayed a perfect 70+ degrees while the smaller cold crop greenhouse was always cooler. I never thought how the fans and shutters were timed to come on at different temperatures and times and what affect the big misting machine had in the tropical greenhouse. Now that I have gained some knowledge I realize there were a lot of components at work to create the atmospheres inside each one of those greenhouses.

Here is my experience with greenhouse growing – Tomatoes:

2015 is my second year growing greenhouse tomatoes from seed! Last year I did not do so well with only 2 plants surviving out of a packet of 70 seeds! My failure was due to a lack of air circulation, nutrients, water and general attention. Lesson learned! This year I have been watching my tomatoes like a hawk.

Here is a comparison of 2014 and 2015.

Greenhouse growing tomatoes
2014 Tomato
Greenhouse growing tomatoes
2014 Tomato

 My 2014 experience was probably common for a lot of beginner gardeners. And I knew it would be a trial and error sort of thing but I was pretty disappointed in these limp little plants. Another factor that inhibited me from successfully growing anything was my access to our outdoor greenhouse. These seeds were started in a indoor greenhouse and then when they were big enough moved outside.

 

Greenhouse growing tomatoes
2015 Tomato
Greenhouse growing tomatoes
2015 Tomato

This year I was able to start seeds in the indoor greenhouse and then put them directly in the outdoor greenhouse when they were big enough to be transplanted. I also was lucky enough to receive 4 packs of seeds from a dear customer of mine in Alaska. She sent me a variety of her own seeds to try growing. I also planted some organic seeds from an online store. And I was definitely surprised by the results! I’m still learning, so every year is a new adventure. This year I learned that I should give the seeds more space when planting because some of the roots were bound together and made it difficult to transplant. Now I know!

Below are pictures of the tomatoes growth. I have to say I am pretty proud :)

How has your gardening been going this year? Comment below.

Learn some new tomato tips from a Sunglo owner here.

Learn about heirloom tomatoes here.

Greenhouse growing tomatoes

Greenhouse growing tomatoesGreenhouse growing tomatoesAnything is possible in a Sunglo greenhouse. From tomatoes to dahlias with our high insulation value and thermostatically controlled ventilation and heating system you can control the environment to your exact needs. Give us a call if you want the freedom of growing in a Sunglo. 425-251-8005.

burlap greenhouse shades

DIY Greenhouse Shades

Pretty Burlap Greenhouse Shades

Post author: Heidi at mysweetcottage.com

 

I still love the Sunglo greenhouse that my husband, Chris, assembled last fall.

Burlap greenhouse shades

Greenhouse in December, 2014, shortly after assembly of the exterior.

And, since I’m new to greenhouse gardening in general, I’m still learning new things about it.

Too Much of a Good Thing

Because of the excellent south-facing location we chose for the greenhouse and the early spring we’ve been having this year, the fan in the greenhouse has been working overtime.  The plants and seeds I started inside have been getting a little too much of some good things – namely heat and sun.

My darling greenhouse is just doing what it’s supposed to do, and it came with a shade cloth for the exterior that we realized we should install pronto for just these kinds of conditions.

A Lighter Shade of . . . Shade

Maybe I was just being naïve, but it seemed to me to be a little early in the year to install the shade cloth.  In the Pacific Northwest, the weather can turn on a dime, and we might still be faced with days of clouds, rain, and general gloominess.

So I started thinking about ways to get some light-duty shade.  Something I could install on the inside of the greenhouse that would allow filtered light and bring the temperature down just a few degrees.

At the fabric store, I ran across that good old standby, burlap.  And burlap is sometimes used in orchards and plantations to shade crops but still provide filtered light.  Perfect.

I chose this soft, pretty burlap.

burlap greenhouse shades

Shading on the Curve

So now we had a new challenge:  How to turn the burlap into shades that would curve with the wall of the greenhouse.

burlap greenhouse shades

Greenhouse before shades

I decided I would leave the ceiling of the greenhouse un-shaded since most of the sunlight comes in from the south-facing wall.  So I would shade the curved wall down to the upper shelf.  That way, plants that needed it could be placed on the lower shelf and still get direct sunlight.

But how to make a shade fit the curve.  At first I thought we (and by “we,” I mean Chris) could install an upper rod to suspend the shades, and then a second rod farther down on the curve.  The shades would then be tucked behind the second rod so they would follow the line of the curve.

But we both hated the thought of drilling a lot of big holes and….

To view this full post you can read it on Heidi’s blog here.

 

Top 5 Easiest Indoor Plants

Easiest Indoor Plants – For Real!

Easiest Indoor plants

Don’t be frightened! If you have a brown thumb these are the plants even you can grow! And from personal experience you really can depend on these plants to thrive in your home. Whether you have never touched a plant in your life or just want some life in your.. well life.. these are the easiest and most low maintenance plants out there! As long as you have a window sill or area in your living room that gets some sun these are plants that will give you years of enjoyment. And take it from me because these are my plants – I’ve had them for years!

Succulents & Cacti

SucculentsSucculents: These beautiful wide ranging plants are very easy to care for and with a wide variety of colors and sizes you can find something to match your decor and state of mind! My little plant (left) has been sitting on my office desk for months now. It came already planted in the stylish round pot. I’ve Cactiwatered it once every week or so. It’s loving the warm indoor temp and sun it gets from my office window. Look for Aloe, Echeveria, and Rosularia for starters. If you need help identifying a succulent visit this site for aCacti Succulent Identifier. Cacti: I know Cacti is a broad term but most of them do very well indoors because they like the warmth and need very little water. I tend to go for the spiky, scary looking ones because they create contrast with the other leafy soft plants we have here in the Sunglo office. As you can see (left and right spiky plants) they are still in their original trays from the nursery but I will be planting them in a container with some succulents to give it more pop!

Bamboo

Easy indoor plants

Stalks of bamboo can be purchased at a wide range of stores. I have seen them in grocery stores in the garden section, little trinket stores at the mall or in the oriental mall we have down the street here in Kent, WA. The stalks come in sizes ranging from a few inches to taller than your tallest cousin. I opted for a medium size of just under 2′ and that’s not counting the foliage that grows out of the top. They can be placed in any kind of container just as long as you keep it 1/3 full of water. Rocks or gems in a clear vase or container give it that extra pizazz. My bamboo has been sitting in the same container for 2 years. I just check the water every month to make sure there is enough. You can find pre made bamboo containers at certain stores that include a tray and rocks and sometimes the bamboo is curled or shaped into a pretty design.

Areca Palm

Areca PalmThis little tropical plant makes a big statement. It can grow to about 7′ tall if you give it the room to. When I bought this little Areca palmguy he was about 2″ shorter and in a smaller pot. I upgraded to a larger pretty yellow pot and he has grown since. It grows individual stalks that long skinny leaves shoot out of. That’s where it gets the “palm” in its name. The individual stalks are unique and this plant makes a great statement when placed in the right spot. It definitely catches your eye. I will be re-potting him into a larger pot soon, I would love to have it grow to 7′ :)

Rubber Tree

Rubber treeThis plant can turn into a large tree over time. They have been known to grow to over 7′ tall and they really make a statement with their bright green foliage. I purchased two plants and re-potted them in larger pots immediately after I got them home. They are both due for an even larger pot now! They do well in a variety of climates but indoors 60-70 degrees is best. With little watering and nothing to prune or cut off the rubber tree makes for a great easy indoor plant!

 

Philodendron

PhilodendronThere are probably hundreds of varieties of Philodendron but most of them have one in thing in common.. they just keep growing! I think they resemble a large ivy. You can grow them so they hang down over doorways or loop around your ceiling for a rainforest affect. This plant (right) came from my boyfriend’s (hopefully fiance soon!) mother’s house. She has had her Philodendron for over 20 years! It wraps around their living room ceiling and hangs over their fire place. These plants need little watering and do enjoy filtered light just like the rest of our easy indoor plants!

 

 

With a little love – very little! – you can grow any of these plants! If you just remember every few weeks to check the soil for moisture and give them a few hours of light everyday/every other day they will grow and prosper and you will have a better quality of life! Everyone should have at least one plant in their home and office. Being close to nature calms us and brings us down to earth – and sometimes that’s just what we need!

Linking to: www.fix.com – Indoor plants that thrive

Starting begonias

Guest Article: Starting Begonias in a Greenhouse

 

 How to Start Tuberous Begonias in the Greenhouse

Tuberous begonias are one of my favorite summertime flowers. Striking in containers and hanging baskets, if treated right they give color all summer and into fall. These big beauties bloom in many colors and are not to be confused with the smaller wax begonias you will see later in the season sold in pony packs. The showy tuberous begonia makes a big impact.

Since tuberous begonias can be started indoors in early spring, I decided to give my begonias a jump start in my greenhouse – Starting begonias in a greenhouse.

  • Choosing Good Tubers

Right around now, begonia tubers are available at home and garden centers,usually in packages of three tubers that look like this.

Healthy tubers
Packages of begonia tubers

Starting out with healthy tubers is very important. While at the garden center, I try to examine the tubers in the package as best I can. I look past the wood chips to determine if the tubers are healthy. I look for plump, firm tubers. If a tuber feels mushy when squeezed, that means it’s starting to rot. I also look for any sign of emerging stems on the concave side of the tuber.

Starting begonias in a greenhouse
Healthy tubers

They usually appear at first as tiny red or pink bumps and then they start to bud out. So in this case, red or pink bumps are a good thing as this means the tuber is viable.

 

 

  •  Starting the Tubers in the Greenhouse

I planted the tubers in square 5-inch plastic pots that drain. I used a 50/50 blend of seedling starter mix and regular potting soil and moistened it slightly before filling the containers.

I filled each container with soil until it was about two to three inches short of the top and then placed the tuber in the middle with the root side down and the side with the emerging stems (pink bumps) up. I pushed the tuber down into the soil but didn’t completely submerge it.

Starting begonias in a greenhouse
Pink/red stems facing up
Starting begonias in a greenhouse
Planted

Then I covered the tubers with a dusting of soil. I watered around (but not on top of) the tuber to moisten the soil. During the tuber’s time in the greenhouse, it’s important to keep the soil moist but not soggy. And since tubers can rot fairly easily, it’s also important not to have standing water on top of the tuber. So in short, water around it, not on top of it. In addition to evenly moist soil, they need lots of bright light, so my grow light will also come in handy.
Once the stems sprout a bit, I will fill more soil in on top of the tuber so that the roots can better develop. Another option at this point is to replant the tuber deeper into the soil.

 

  • Going Outside

When the danger of frost has passed and evening temperatures stay above 50⁰F, I can replant the begonias into containers or hanging baskets and place them outside in partial shade. They should be kept evenly moist (but not soggy) throughout the summer and fertilized occasionally. I’m looking forward to the show.

Starting begonias in a greenhouse
About our guest writer:  Heidi lives in the Seattle area with her husband, Chris. In the fall of 2014, they became the proud owners of their own Sunglo greenhouse. Read about their experiences with their greenhouse and their other home and garden projects on Heidi’s blog, My Sweet Cottage.

If you have a Sunglo greenhouse and would like to share your experiences, submit an article to info@sunglogreenhouses.com. From greenhouse gardening to replacing a panel on your greenhouse etc. – 4 paragraph minimum. Please include pictures.

greenhouse gardening basics

Greenhouse Gardening Basics

Greenhouse Gardening – The Basics

A few basic items that we recommend you start off with and some words of encouragement!

 

The time has finally come. After all the hours of researching, sifting through greenhouse blogs and forums, having those off and on feelings about making the decision and debating whether or not you have the time and energy to even use one; You have purchased your own greenhouse! And frankly it should be one of the best decisions you made! Greenhouse’s not only give you a space to grow and overwinter plants but the enrichment gardening brings to people’s lives is incredible. And let’s not down play the fact that you will save a few bucks too! But once you have made it through the pain and hectic-ness of finding your perfect greenhouse, building the foundation, greenhouse assembly and the spendy electrician… where do you start? Greenhouse gardening is not as scary as it looks. The greenhouse itself will do a lot of the work for you. Light, air circulation, heat and controls are provided for you. Sunglo’s packages include lighting, ventilation system (for air circulation), heater, controls, etc. – To make life easier on you. Once these have been electrically hooked up you can focus on the fun stuff!

I am a beginner gardener myself and I started off with a small lean-to greenhouse but had no idea where to start! Luckily I had some help and now can say I have an ity bity tiny amount of experience under my belt!

If you own a Sunglo greenhouse you should either have the built in benches and shelves or purchased your own bench system. Obviously this design depends on the type of plants and amount of plants you intend to grow. But adequate space for pots and thingy majigs will make life easier.

 

Here is a list of items I suggest you purchase to start off-

  1. A large bag of soil – Go with a brand that will feed the plants for 90+ days and is suitable for indoor/outdoor gardening. (If you have good compost in your garden already, a special fine seed starter soil without the nutrients might be best.)

 

  1. Seeds! – Choose 3-5 packets to start with and make sure they are appropriate for the season. I would suggest some flowers and tomatoes. Also, read the back of the packet. Seed packets have a great deal of info on the back and the difference between needing full sun and partial shade etc. may sway your decisions.

 

  1. Plants – You want your greenhouse to feel like a garden, so choose a few pretty, green, grown plants to stick in the corners or pull them from the plants you already own. I like cacti and succulents. They are easy to care for and look great! Don’t forget to grab a few pretty pots to transfer them into. The book “The Greenhouse Expert” by Dr. D.G. Hessayon is very useful and provides detailed information on greenhouse plants. I would pick up this book immediately!

 

  1. Little things – Grab a few seed trays (You know the black trays with 50+ squares), you’ll want a small and a large water can, a few 5 gallon buckets for plant scraps, a small circulation fan (unless you have one from Sunglo already), work gloves (get 2 pairs JIC!), hand trowel (small garden shovel), and take a look through all the goodies in your local nursery or garden store. There are always fun things you can pick up!

 

It really depends on the plants you will be growing to determine what kinds of accessories you will want. Eventually you might want to upgrade your atmospheric controls or install some extra shelving. Greenhouses are so fun and customizable. Follow your heart! And remember you can always change things around. Nothing is permanent.

 

The main things to remember are light, temperature and water. As long as you give your plants adequate light, keep the desired temperature and water your plants to their specific needs you should have no problems! – OK you might run into a few along the way! I won’t lie to you! But those things are for later on. Enjoy your greenhouse! Experiment with different plants and flowers. Find your passion and relax in your own paradise! That is what a greenhouse is all about. Fulfilling your passion and creating your own oasis.

 

Need help? You can always contact us at Sunglo for any questions about your greenhouse or growing. And Visit us on Facebook to see what other customers have done to their greenhouses and what they have growing!

Treatment for black fungus gnats

Black Fungus Gnat – IPM Treatment

Fungus gnats
Fungus Gnats on Cacti

GNATS

We all know what a gnat is. Most likely you have had a few gnats flying around your home, more commonly known as “fruit flies”. But fungus gnats are your gardens worst nightmare! They are small flies that infest soil and potting mix and lay their eggs in your container gardens as well. Their eggs can lay dormant in soil for weeks and then release these nasty little larvae that wreak havoc on your plants. Their larvae primarily feed on fungi and organic matter in soil, but also chew into roots and can be a problem in greenhouses, nurseries, potted plants and interior plants. Adult fungus gnats may emerge from houseplants and become a nuisance indoors too.

Fungus gnat larvae
Fungus Gnat Larvae
Fungus gnat Adult
Adult Fungus Gnat

 

 

 

 

 

 

TREATMENTS

There are a bunch of organic and chemical treatments for fungus gnats. The organic solutions include:

Hydrogen peroxide w/ no additives, Boiled grapefruit rind, Neem oil and a plethora of IPM.

We discovered we had gnats in our indoor Sunglo greenhouse after purchasing a bag of store bought miracle soil. It has been a HUGE problem. At least 100 plants have been ruined. So we researched online and came to the conclusion that we would try nematodes.

What are nematodes?

fungus gnat
Microscopic Nematode

The nematodes or roundworms constitute the phylum Nematoda. They are a diverse animal phylum inhabiting a very broad range of environments. Nematode species can be difficult to distinguish, and although over 25,000 have been described, of which more than half are parasitic, the total number of nematode species has been estimated to be about 1 million. Unlike cnidarians and flatworms, nematodes have tubular digestive systems with openings at both ends. Nematodes have successfully adapted to nearly every ecosystem from marine to fresh water, to soils, and from the polar regions to the tropics, as well as the highest to the lowest of elevations. They are ubiquitous in freshwater, marine, and terrestrial environments, where they often outnumber other animals in both individual and species counts, and are found in locations as diverse as mountains, deserts and oceanic trenches. The earth benefits from these microscopic worms. They are pretty much everywhere!

NEMATODE TREATMENT

fungus gnat
A Fungus Gnats Worst Nightmare!

There are lots of brand of nematodes to buy but we settled on this baby. Above. The nematodes come wrapped in a soft wet sponge ready to swim their way into your soil and eat the fungus gnat larvae!

fungus gnat
Remove sponge from bag..

 

fungus gnat
Dunk sponge into a watering can.. and water all your plants.

By dunking the sponge in water and swooshing it around a bit, it will release the microscopic nematodes into the water and allow them to be transferred into your infested soil. One they have broken the soil barrier the nematodes are free to wreak

havoc on the fungus gnat larvae! Too bad they are microscopic. It would be pretty neat to see :)

CONCLUSION

The nematode treatment worked, along with sticky tape but only for a week or so. It was difficult keeping our greenhouse contained. The gnats had too many places to hide in our building and were able to fly freely in and out of the greenhouse. In a different situation the nematodes, I’m sure, would have wiped out the larvae and our problem would have disappeared. We eventually cleaned out the entire greenhouse, cleaned all pots and containers, threw away all the dirt that was sitting around and moved most of the plants outside for a weekend to try to abolish the pesky gnats! And so far we’ve gotten rid of ALMOST all of them. The orchids we have in the greenhouse now are doing pretty well – See picture below. There are still a few gnats buzzing around but they have not harmed our orchid collection. We definitely learned a lesson from this… no more store bought generic soil! And to keep the greenhouse as clean as possible when planting seeds. The next time we see the first signs of gnats we’ll reach into our Google arsenal and find the next best treatment.

fungus gnat
Our display greenhouse after being cleaned out

Other pest problems? Click here for thrip information. Click here for aphid & white fly treatment. And for more information about greenhouses and greenhouse gardening visit our Facebook page!

 

Orchid care for beginners video

Orchid care

I have recently become an orchid enthusiast. We have filled up our small display greenhouse with 9 orchids so far and they are piling up! There is so much information online about orchid care it can get confusing! And each species requires different lighting, temps and care. But I found this great YouTube video series for orchid beginners. It covers everything from watering to re potting and even disease. I have been researching orchid care for months now and this video host is very knowledgeable and fun to watch! Watch a few posts and you wont be sorry! I sure am happy I found this! Press link below for series.

Basic Orchid Care for Beginners

Greenhouse Growing – Air Plants (Tillandsia)

Air plants (Tillandsia)

Campbell12

Air plants have taken off recently and it is no wonder. They are magnificent plants and require little care for beautiful results. Take your pick of 600 varities of air plant! Air plant is actually just the nickname for the real name which is Tillandsia. Tillandsia varieties are native to Central and South American deserts, forests and mountains. The thinner-leafed varieties grow in rainy areas and the thick-leafed varieties in areas more subject to drought. Tillandsia species are epiphytes, meaning they normally grow without soil while attached to other plants. A lot like

Tillandsia and pup
Air Plant with pup – Wikipedia

orchids. They are not parasitic and receive moisture and nutrients from the air (dust, decaying leaves and insect matter) through hair like structures on the leaves called trichomes. A big difference between air plants and orchids is they require very little care. They love bright, indirect sunlight and a warm moist environment. They can tolerate temperatures as low as 50F to about 90F. Air plants are amazing because reproduction is by offsets called “pups” pictured above. A single plant could have up to a dozen pups. The pups grow off of the “mother” plant until it is large enough to separate and become its own plant.

Tillandsia
Lynda’s design – Hanging terrarium

Thanks to our customer Lynda C. I have come to love these whimsical plants and learn that they grow wonderfully in our greenhouses. Lynda discovered tillandsias and fell in love! This love prompted her to purchase a greenhouse and open up shop to sell the plants she adores. Air plants make beautiful and surprising gifts and are sold as decorations. Lynda designs a variety of terrariums, hangers, zen gardens and holders from different mixed media to highlight their beauty and uniqueness. They are truly beautiful pieces of art. To visit her website Random Oddities click here and see all of her passion filled designs. You can also visit Lynda and purchase items if you live in the Ann Arbor, MI. area. Her air plant decorations are on sale at Town Peddler in Livonia.

Sunglo lean-to greenhouse
Lynda’s 5 x 15 lean-to sunglo greenhouse with shade cloth in use

Lynda grows her air plants in her lean-to Sunglo greenhouse pictured to the right. She says they grow wonderfully in the greenhouse and can easily control the temperature for maximum growth. Lynda and her husband customized their greenhouse by building an extended wooden foundation to give the extra room and height they desired. She now happily runs her

business with a supply of never ending air plants in her Sunglo greenhouse!

Tillandsia
Air plants growing on homemade mesh shelves in Lynda’s sunglo greenhouse

Lynda’s designs are great for any room of your house and come in all sizes. She has a great variety of air plants. For her full selection visit her gallery here. And like her on Facebook! See examples below.

Tillandsia veluntinaTillandsia ionantha peach

Tillandsia caput medusae

Tillandsia fuchsii v gracillis

Sunglo’s Lean-to DIY Greenhouse Kits

Sunglo greenhouse kits are easy to build, long lasting and have excellent insulation. We offer free-standing and lean-to greenhouse kits.They are less expensive to heat and very low maintenance compared to other brands. We also keep in close contact with our customers.

Harold’s review writes:

Thanks for your assistance with my order this morning.
Here are some shots of my 1700-E taken at several different time points. My greenhouse is almost 10 years old and is still standing. Hope you enjoy.
forever strong sunglo greenhouse kits

forever strong sunglo greenhouse kits

Cheers,
Hal
Our lean-to diy greenhouse kits are very versatile and it’s easy to add customized accessories. We offer a wide range of accessories and gardening tools that were designed specifically for the Sunglo brand. Please see our Sunglo Product post.
Here is an example of a lean-to foundation and finished 1700 model lean-to kit:
lean-to greenhouse kits
lean-to greenhouse kits
lean-to greenhouse kits
Completed assembly of the foundation and lean-to sunglo greenhouse
Our lean-to greenhouses are a great option for a cramped backyard or small apartment space. They can be constructed on a deck, house, barn.. anywhere you have room! And you choose your foundation. Click here to learn about building your very own Sunglo.
Here is an example of a 1500 lean-to model:
1500 Series
If you are interested in a lean-to greenhouse please e-mail a request for a foundation guide to info@sunglogreenhouses.com. Or give us a call at 1-800-647-0606. We offer M-F support for questions. And replacement parts are always available. To see updated customer photos and stay up to date with our staff visit our Facebook page. To view an actual customer lean-to project click here.

Sunglo Greenhouse Accessories and Parts

Sunglo carries a wide range of accessories and Sunglo parts. We now offer complete packages that include all the items you’ll need to have your greenhouse up running and at a discounted price! For a complete accessory and parts catalog please e-mail us at info@sunglogreenhouses.com with your request or call our 800 number below.

Here are a few items that are included in our greenhouse packages:

 

sunglo greenhouse accessories and parts
Benches and lighting: 30″ x 30″ cedar benches, 30″ x 12″ cedar shelves and fluorescent light fixture with 2 T8 bulbs and hanging hardware

 

sunglo greenhouse accessories and parts
Light kit: Moisture resistant light timer and fluorescent light fixture – Pictured above

 

Sunglo greenhouse accessories and parts
Irrigation kit: Coil hose, water wand and drip watering kit

 

sunglo greenhouse accessories and producta
Shade Cloth: A custom cut shade cloth to fit your Sunglo, 74% gradient polypropylene with grommet holes.

Sunglo Greenhouses offers DIY greenhouse kits in free-standing and lean-to sizes. We also carry greenhouse accessories and Sunglo parts. Our warehouse is open M-F from 8am to 4pm to assist you in ordering parts. You can contact our sales office at 1-800-647-0606 for questions or to place orders.