Tagged: diy

Sunglo Greenhouse Accessories and Parts

Sunglo carries a wide range of accessories and Sunglo parts. We now offer complete packages that include all the items you’ll need to have your greenhouse up running and at a discounted price! For a complete accessory and parts catalog please e-mail us at info@sunglogreenhouses.com with your request or call our 800 number below.

Here are a few items that are included in our greenhouse packages:

 

sunglo greenhouse accessories and parts
Benches and lighting: 30″ x 30″ cedar benches, 30″ x 12″ cedar shelves and fluorescent light fixture with 2 T8 bulbs and hanging hardware

 

sunglo greenhouse accessories and parts
Light kit: Moisture resistant light timer and fluorescent light fixture – Pictured above

 

Sunglo greenhouse accessories and parts
Irrigation kit: Coil hose, water wand and drip watering kit

 

sunglo greenhouse accessories and producta
Shade Cloth: A custom cut shade cloth to fit your Sunglo, 74% gradient polypropylene with grommet holes.

Sunglo Greenhouses offers DIY greenhouse kits in free-standing and lean-to sizes. We also carry greenhouse accessories and Sunglo parts. Our warehouse is open M-F from 8am to 4pm to assist you in ordering parts. You can contact our sales office at 1-800-647-0606 for questions or to place orders.

School Grants and Greenhouses

School Grants & Greenhouses

Gardening is a valuable tool for children of all ages. Learning about plants, how things grow and how to nurture and care for living organisms. Caring for plants introduces

2100 School Greenhouse
            SCC – 2100 Model

many other topics such as the role insects play and the importance of light, water and maintenance.  Gardening has been known to also improves children’s environmental attitudes, their social skills and nutritional attitudes.  The National Gardening Association has provided grant funding for the past 29 years to support youth garden programs. They have awarded over 9,000 grants throughout the years and provided beneficial education to our nation’s children. The benefits from school gardens reach everyone including the parents, teachers and administrators. To view a list of grants available and valuable resources visit this website.

2100 School Greenhouse
          SCC – 2100 Model

Sunglo has been a proud resource for school greenhouses for many years. Providing a covered, safe area for children to learn about gardening and all the beautiful life lessons along with it. Working with faculty and administrative staff to achieve their horticultural goals has been a humbling experience for all of us here at Sunglo and we feel honored to be apart of it. We also offer an educational discount to help relieve some of the financial stress. Our office team and warehouse/assembly team are knowledgeable and will see your project through to the finish. From the time the greenhouse is ordered we are here to answer any questions from shipping to construction. We can give you advice on permitting, the foundation and which size would benefit your school. Replacement parts are always available too, so in the future just give us a call! If you or someone you know is interested in a school greenhouse please contact us with any questions or for a free quote.

Sunglo greenhouses are all over the US and Alaska. If you would like to speak with another school that is using a Sunglo brand greenhouse please give us a call at 800-647-0606 with your request and we’ll be happy to help find one for you to connect with!

 

For another post about school greenhouses click here.

 

 

 

 

The Importance of Shade Cloths

Shade cloth
1000D Sunglo With Shade Cloth

There are many factors involved in greenhouse gardening. And we all know that to grow different plants and flowers the conditions need to be just right. So climate control and ventilation are very important. Greenhouses can get very hot in certain areas around the country. So for that extra protection we offer shade cloths.

shade cloth
1700D Sunglo With Shade Cloth

But why? Well, in humid areas misting and fogging may not be adequate enough in thosehot summer months. And excess moisture build up can become a problem.

There are many different ways to “shade” your greenhouse. Spray on and liquid options are available. As well as woven polyester or even aluminum varieties. Shade cloths can be found in varying densities or degrees of shade from approximately 5% to 95%.

shade cloth material
Sunglo’s Shade Cloth Material

Sunglo offers a 73% gradient polypropylene cloth with double sewn reinforced hems and brass grommets for easy anchoring. Polypropylene is a thermoplastic polymer and it is used in a variety of products around the world.

 Polypropylene is normally colored using carbon black. It is tough stuff but still flexible and it has good resistance to fatigue. It is suseptable to UV damage from sunlight exposure but our shade cloths are coated with a UV absorbing additive and carbon black also has some “SPF” properties to it.

Shade cloth
Sunglo’s Shade Cloth Packaged

Shade cloths can be the difference between beautiful plants or burnt plants! Don’t leave your plants to risk, shade cloths are inexpensive and will last you through the years keeping your plants safe and happy!

 Please contact us to request our complete pricing and product catalog.

To attach Sunglo’s shade cloth to your greenhouse, use some bungee cord or rope to thread through the grommets and secure them to some loop posts that are anchored to the ground or base. Lean-to models: For convenience try to set up the loop posts so you can easily roll the shade cloth up or down.

Call or e-mail us for our shade cloth instruction diagram. Please specify free-standing or lean-to.

For more information on Sunglo’s shade cloths or other greenhouse accessories please contact us anytime. And visit us on Facebook for promotion updates and gardening info.

DIY greenhouse shades
DIY greenhouse shades

To see how to install these light weight shades click here.

Recipes – Prime Soup Season!

I love food! So I have decided to mix it up a bit and start a monthly recipe blog post series! Showcasing my favorite recipes and copycat recipes from my recipe book and from around the web! SO here is the very first recipe post: Top 5 winter soup recipes!

Who doesn’t love a hearty chili or a classic chicken soup? Winter time is prime soup season. And I have traveled the web and through my recipe books to find my favorite recipes, that I know you will enjoy! So please pick 1 or pick them all and get your soup on!

 

French Onion SoupFrench Onion

Oh baby, I love onions! I could eat them raw, baked, blanched, battered, fried, grilled, barbecued you name it. But French onion soup is at the top of my list of onion recipes. The warm gooey cheese sinking the crusty bread into the savory, beefy, oniony flavored broth … MMM! This is my favorite winter soup!

Roasted Cauliflower SoupRoasted Cauliflower Soup

Don’t be afraid, I know it sounds fancy but this was a hard one to put at 2nd place. This soup changed my mind about cauliflower. Every other time I have eaten cauliflower I just did not enjoy it. This soup is absolutely delicious. I omitted the prosciutto for bacon and left out the almonds and it was perfect for my taste buds. This is a crowd pleaser and if you want to impress someone with your cooking skills this winter but with little effort and big reward this is the recipe to use!

Butternut Squash SoupButternut Squash Soup

Squash is kind of a foreign food to me. I have not experimented much with squash but acorn and butternut are the ones I always go for. The first time I had butternut squash soup was when my mother brought home a store bought container of it on a “no cook” night. It was amazing! This recipe is delicious. If you have never tried butternut soup this is the one to try. It’s easy and will warm your belly right up!

White ChiliWhite Chicken Chili

Chicken chili doesn’t sound very hearty. At least that’s what my boyfriend thought before this recipe. When people think of chili they almost always think of beef chili. But boy I’ll tell you this white chicken chili will change your mind! It is superfast and the left overs are just as good as the first day. This is a must try recipe!

Cocunut Chicken SoupCoconut Chicken Curry Soup

I don’t know about you but my boyfriend and I are in love with Thai food. I mean we have been to probably all of the Thai restaurants around our town. This soup has a creamy coconut flavor that just doesn’t get any better than paired with rice and a few lime wedges! I use curry paste instead of powder and microwaved some carrots, chopped them and threw them in to add some more color and crunchy. Superb!

Baked Potato SoupBacked Potato Soup

I had to put this recipe on the list because it is just the best winter soup to eat curled up under a blanket with your honey. We love this recipe because its hearty and cheesy and we always have the best night sleep after a huge serving! Try this recipe please, it will become a favorite, I just know it!

Let’s dabble in APPLE!

Mix applesAn apple a day keeps the doctor away. Haven’t we all heard that saying? Well obviously apple is a fruit and fruit is healthy for you. But they seem to be one of those fruits that have super powers! They can be made into hundreds if not thousands of dishes. And I don’t think I know 1 person that doesn’t like a dish that has apple in it. So let’s go on an adventure..  and dabble in apple!

It is one of the most widely cultivated tree fruits, and the most widely known of the many members of genus Malus. Apples grow on small, deciduous trees. The tree originated in Central Asia, where its wild ancestor, Malus sieversii, can still be found today. Apples have been grown for thousands of years in Asia and Europe. They were brought to North America by European colonists in the 17th century. The first apple orchard was planted in Boston in 1695. A long time ago! Apples have been present in mythology and religions of many cultures, including Greek and Christian traditions. There are more than 7,500 known types of apples. Different strains are bred for various tastes and uses.

Here are a few wacky apple facts:

  • Apples are a member of the rose family.
  • Apples are grown in all 50 states.
  • The science of apple growing is called pomology.
  • India ranks 3rd in the worlds apple producing leaders.
  • Peach allergies are similar to apple allergies and usually go hand in hand.
  • The average person eats 65 apples per year.
  • Apples became the official state fruit for Washington in 1989.
  • Apple trees can only bear fruit after its first 5 years.
  • The McIntosh apple is the national apple of Canada.
  • It takes about 35 apples to produce 1 gallon of apple cider.
  • Apples were considered “luxury fruit” in ancient Rome.
  • Fear of apples is known as Malusdomesticaphobia.
  • Apples contain Boron which has been known to enhance brain power.
  • The Roman Goddess Pomona is the goddess of apples.
  • Children who drink apple juice regularly have less of a chance of developing asthma.

 

Apples - treeAbout 69 million tons of apples were grown worldwide in 2010, and China produced almost half of this total. The US is the second leading producer with more than 5% of world production. Many beneficial health effects can come from eating these babies too. A few health benefits are:

  • Research shows that the dietary fibers found in apples battle further growth of lung, colon and breast cancer.
  • Pyridoxine is a nutrient in apples that is useful in treating heart disease, diabetes and seizures.
  • They help fight off free oxygen-radicals that cause diabetes.
  • Studies have shown that people who eat more apples have a lower risk for stroke.

 

Apples are amazing in that they can be served for breakfast, lunch, dinner and dessert.  There are so many dishes that are apple-tastic including pastries, salads, cakes, even burgers! Check out these apple-licious recipes:

Apples baked Baked Apple Recipe!

Apples - burgerChicken Burger Recipe!

Apples - popsiclesApple Popsicle Recipe!

I hope you had fun on our apple-venture and learned some new things! For more interesting info on apples click here. 

Or if you want to see a whole list of apple recipes click here.

Sunglo Surface Area Guide

Sunglo Greenhouses Surface Areas-

This post is a supplement of a previous post for determining the heating or BTU requirements of your greenhouse – Click here to read the Greenhouse Heating post.

The following are approximate surface area’s of each Sunglo greenhouse series.

1000 Series - Surface Area

  • 1000 Series – 7′ 9″ Width

Model                Surface Area

7.5ft – B                     228

10ft – C                      276

12.5ft – D                   324

15ft – E                      372

17.5ft – F                   420

For every 2.5ft after model 1000F add 48 to the surface area.

1200 Series - Surface Area

  •  1200 Series – 10′ 3″ Width

Model                Surface Area

10ft – C                       338

12.5ft – D                    392

15ft – E                       446

17.5ft – F                    500

20ft – G                       554

For every 2.5ft after model 1200G add 54 to the surface area.

2100 Series - Surface Area

  • 2100 Series – 15′ 3″ Width

Model                Surface Area

10ft – C                     484

12.5ft – D                  549

15ft – E                     614

17.5ft – F                  679

20ft – G                    744

For every 2.5ft after model 2100G add 65 to the surface area.

1500 Series - Surface Area

  • 1500 Lean-To Series – 5′ 1.5″ Width

Model               Surface Area

10ft – C                    169

12.5ft – D                 196

15ft – E                     223

17.5ft – F                  250

20ft – G                    277

For every 2.5ft after model 1500G add 27 to the surface area.

1700 Series - SUrface Area

  • 1700 Lean-To Series – 7′ 7.5″ Width

Model                Surface Area

10ft – C                    242

12.5ft – D                 275

15ft – E                    307

17.5ft – F                 340

20ft – G                    372

For every 2.5ft after model 1700G add 33 to the surface area.

If you are a customer with a custom style Sunglo or have a discontinued series or just have questions please give us a call at 1-800-647-0606.

Alaska Grown Program

Alaska Grown Logo

The agriculture industry in Alaska created the Alaska Grown logo to highlight products grown in Alaska. The program is designed to increase consumer awareness and consumption of Alaska agricultural products. The Alaska Grow logo will start showing up on all sorts of Alaska goods and I think it’s a great thing! Every community should embrace the “home grown” products in their area. It not only helps the hard working families but locally grown fruits and veggies will keep our families on the healthy track as well! I commend Alaska for starting this program!

One of Sunglo’s favorite customers from Alaska just got finished building his 2100F Sunglo. Look at that snow! He sent us:

“Here’s pictures of some Alaskan hoodlums… thanks again for a great greenhouse and customer service!”

–Mr. B

 

Alaska Grown Alaska GrownHoodlums? Well I don’t know about that. But they certainly look like Alaskan grown kids to me! Thank you for the awesome pictures Mr. B!

For more information on the Alaska Grown program Click Here.

Heirloom tomatoes – What are they?

heirloom tomatoesHeirloom tomatoes. I think we have all seen them. Big, plump and multicolored. But what are they and where did they come from? According to Carolyn Male and Craig Lehoullier, two top tomato experts, heirlooms fall into four categories:

Commercial heirloom1.  Commercial heirlooms: Open pollinated tomato varieties more than 40 years old, introduced by seed companies somewhere around 1950.

 

 Family - Pink oxheart2.  Family heirlooms: Tomato seeds that were passed down from generation to generation creating some of the best varieties available. Like the pink oxheart shown above.

 

Created heirloom3.  Created heirlooms: Cross-breeding between heirlooms and/or hybrids until the desired characteristics are achieved. This has been known to take 5+ years

 

 Mystery heirloom4.  Mystery heirlooms: Natural cross-breeding or mutation between heirloom varieties. This is how most heirlooms originated.

 

 Where did the term “heirloom” come from you ask? Well Kent Whealy of Seed Savers Exchange first used “heirloom” in relation to plants in a speech he gave in Tucson Arizona in 1981. He had asked permission to use the term “heirloom” from a man named John Withee, who had used it on the cover of his bean catalog. John had taken the term from Professor William Helper at the University of New Hampshire, who first used “heirloom” to describe beans that friends gave him back in the 1940’s. To me heirloom means a family item that has been passed down for many years and is kept within the family. Pretty cool how it was applied to tomatoes.

heirlooms1Heirloom tomatoes have a large range of flavors and colors. The best tasting tomatoes you have ever had! Their flavors range from smoky and deep to candy-like and sweet. You never know, your neighbor could be growing the best tomatoes in the world in their backyard and you would never know it.  Heirlooms are a dying breed. You should be able to find them at some farmers markets and maybe a few big box stores. But if we could teach our children to keep their own gardens, the future could have an abundance of heirlooms and not just tomatoes but all types of heirloom vegetables. Wouldn’t that be sweet??

 

Want to read more about heirloom flavors? Check out this article.

And learn some new greenhouse tomato growing tips here.

Greenhouse Heaters – Which One Is Right For You?

Greenhouse HeaterGreenhouse heaters. Electric, natural gas, propane and many more. But which heater is right for your greenhouse? How do you find out? This is where BTU’s (British thermal units) come in. To find the best heater for your greenhouse you must know the number of BTU’s required. And I am going to show you how to determine it!

Here are a few simple steps to find your BTU requirement.

 

  • STEP 1

You need to know the surface area of your greenhouse. This is not simply multiplying the length and width. You must calculate the area of each wall and each ceiling panel then add them all together. If you have a Sunglo greenhouse click here for Sunglo’s Surface Area Guide post.

  • STEP 2

Next you need to find out the average winter temperature (outside) in your area. This is where the internet comes in handy. But I made it easy for you > Click here to view a list of average temperatures in the U.S.

  • STEP 3

Now what temperature do you want to keep your greenhouse at in the winter? This depends on the plants you are growing. You should be able to find plant temperatures online. But a common minimum temperature for over wintering is 50°F.

  • STEP 4

The next step is finding your greenhouse’s U-Value or Heat Transfer Coefficient. This is determined by the material your greenhouse is made of. For a Sunglo greenhouse we use a U-Value of 0.75. To find your specific materials U-Value > Click here for a general list.

  •  STEP 5

Now that you have completed the first 4 steps you should have –

  1. Your greenhouse surface area
  2. Average winter temperature
  3. Desired greenhouse temperature for the winter months
  4. Your greenhouse material U-Value

Now we can find our required BTU’s!

And here is the formula –

  • Desired greenhouse winter temp – Average winter temp outside  = Temp differential
  • Surface area × temp differential × U-Value = Required BTU

For example:

My greenhouse surface area is 744

My average winter temp is 20°F

Desired greenhouse winter temp is 50°F

Sunglo acrylic U-Value is 0.75

  • 50° − 20° = 30° (Temp differential)
  • 744 (surface area) × 30 (temp differential) × 0.75 (U-value) = 16,740 BTU’s

Now you can shop for a heater that provides at least 16,740 BTU’s!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edible Flowers

Calendula Salad

Flowers. Annuals, perennials, colorful and cheerful. Flowers can brighten up a gloomy day or give a new flavor to your favorite dish. Yes, some flowers are edible. Just to name a few calendula, impatiens, day lilies, violets, carnations, pansies and begonias. I thought I would share a bit of interesting information about some of my personal favorites. Calendula, impatiens and day lilies.

Edible Calendula VarietyCalendula

The calendula is an annual flower native to the northern Mediterranean countries. They are a beautiful cheery flower that follows the path of the sun throughout the day in the same way that sunflowers do. Calendula comes in a variety of orange-ish yellows. It has a zingy, peppery flavor and is an easy to grow flower that is beautiful, edible and has medicinal uses. Calendula petals are edible, so steer clear of any other part. The dried petals are commonly used in creams, teas, infusions, and washes. They can also be added to salads, cream based soups or used as a garnish on just about anything. Calendula has also been known for treating acne, reducing inflammation, controlling bleeding, and soothing irritated tissue. Early spring to summer is the recommended planting season. Aphids are the most common insect problem. But they can be easily treated with an insecticide. The most common disease affecting calendula is mildew which occurs most under hot, humid or moist/rainy conditions. Fungicides should take care of any mildew. Germination takes 10 to 14 days. Calendula can survive light frosts but will usually die from heavy frost. Many times they will be the last of the annual flowers still blooming in late fall. To give your home a bit of natural beauty they work very well mixed with other flowers in floral arrangements but check thoroughly for aphids because they are a pest to have in your home.

Warning: Calendula has been known to affect women’s reproductive systems and menstruation. Do not digest calendula when pregnant or when trying to be pregnant.

Edible Impatiens VarietyImpatiens

Impatiens are a popular flower in the northern hemisphere and many people do not know this but you can eat them! They are quite tasty in salads, desserts and drinks. They are wonderful as a garnish on any dish because their flavor is light and sweet. Impatiens have medicinal uses as well. They have been used to treat bee stings, insect bites and stinging nettle. Impatiens produce flowers from early summer until the first frost. Impatiens like shade and moisture and prefer part shade though they do like sun if protected by shade in late afternoon. Impatiens prefer moist, well-drained soil. The most important thing to remember about impatiens is to water them regularly. Keep them moist but not too wet. The leaves will fall off if they are not watered enough.

Edible Day Lilies Day Lily

Day Lilies are a perennial and bloom from mid-spring to mid-summer. They are completely edible! The petals, stem, buds and even the root. You will see day lilies often in Chinese cuisine. I personally have never eaten this flower but I have heard it has a mild flavor with vegetable notes and have a faint taste of sweet melon. The flavor combination has been described as a mix of asparagus, lettuce and sweet cucumber. Some think that the color of the flower affects its flavor. But I do not have the experience to know if this is true or not. Day lilies buds and flower are the sweetest part and can be eaten raw or cooked. For desserts the petals are excellent, just make sure to cut away the white base of the flower as this is where it has a more bitter taste. The roots have been said to be delicious when boiled like potatoes. The young leaves from the stem taste like lettuce and are very yummy in salads. For a satisfying snack the flowers and seed pods can be battered and deep fried. YUM! I recommend buying an already blossomed plant as they have been known to take up to 2 years to bloom when starting from seeds.

Day lily plants don’t need protection in the winter in most areas. The leaves will die back in the winter and return again in the spring. Day lilies are so beautiful to decorate with. Every time I see them in someone’s home I can’t resist touching and admiring them. If you want to try an edible flower that is delicious and easy to add to foods but also a beautiful decoration then the day lily is the one for you.

A Great book about edible flowers is Eat Your Yard < For sale on Google.