Tagged: greenhouse growing

Greenhouse Growing – Tomatoes

 

Greenhouse growing tomatoes
Greenhouse Tomatoes

Greenhouse Growing Tomatoes:

Greenhouse growing can be intimidating. Considering all of the factors like light, heat, ventilation, controls, etc. and how to incorporate them perfectly together to create the optimum gardening environment may seem like a daunting task. But if you choose the right greenhouse brand and do a little research you’ll come to realize that it’s easier then it sounds. Here’s a history lesson of my gardening experience; I have been working for Sunglo for almost 3 years now and before I started working for this wonderful company I had very little growing experience and no greenhouse knowledge what so ever. I grew up working at my aunts nursery watering, and moving plants from greenhouse to greenhouse. I never grew any plants myself or even really thought about it. And I was never aware of  how complex the environment was. Like how the cactus greenhouse stayed a perfect 70+ degrees while the smaller cold crop greenhouse was always cooler. I never thought how the fans and shutters were timed to come on at different temperatures and times and what affect the big misting machine had in the tropical greenhouse. Now that I have gained some knowledge I realize there were a lot of components at work to create the atmospheres inside each one of those greenhouses.

Here is my experience with greenhouse growing – Tomatoes:

2015 is my second year growing greenhouse tomatoes from seed! Last year I did not do so well with only 2 plants surviving out of a packet of 70 seeds! My failure was due to a lack of air circulation, nutrients, water and general attention. Lesson learned! This year I have been watching my tomatoes like a hawk.

Here is a comparison of 2014 and 2015.

Greenhouse growing tomatoes
2014 Tomato
Greenhouse growing tomatoes
2014 Tomato

 My 2014 experience was probably common for a lot of beginner gardeners. And I knew it would be a trial and error sort of thing but I was pretty disappointed in these limp little plants. Another factor that inhibited me from successfully growing anything was my access to our outdoor greenhouse. These seeds were started in a indoor greenhouse and then when they were big enough moved outside.

 

Greenhouse growing tomatoes
2015 Tomato
Greenhouse growing tomatoes
2015 Tomato

This year I was able to start seeds in the indoor greenhouse and then put them directly in the outdoor greenhouse when they were big enough to be transplanted. I also was lucky enough to receive 4 packs of seeds from a dear customer of mine in Alaska. She sent me a variety of her own seeds to try growing. I also planted some organic seeds from an online store. And I was definitely surprised by the results! I’m still learning, so every year is a new adventure. This year I learned that I should give the seeds more space when planting because some of the roots were bound together and made it difficult to transplant. Now I know!

Below are pictures of the tomatoes growth. I have to say I am pretty proud 🙂

How has your gardening been going this year? Comment below.

Learn some new tomato tips from a Sunglo owner here.

Learn about heirloom tomatoes here.

Greenhouse growing tomatoes

Greenhouse growing tomatoesGreenhouse growing tomatoesAnything is possible in a Sunglo greenhouse. From tomatoes to dahlias with our high insulation value and thermostatically controlled ventilation and heating system you can control the environment to your exact needs. Give us a call if you want the freedom of growing in a Sunglo. 425-251-8005.

Guest Article: Starting Begonias in a Greenhouse

 

 How to Start Tuberous Begonias in the Greenhouse

Tuberous begonias are one of my favorite summertime flowers. Striking in containers and hanging baskets, if treated right they give color all summer and into fall. These big beauties bloom in many colors and are not to be confused with the smaller wax begonias you will see later in the season sold in pony packs. The showy tuberous begonia makes a big impact.

Since tuberous begonias can be started indoors in early spring, I decided to give my begonias a jump start in my greenhouse – Starting begonias in a greenhouse.

  • Choosing Good Tubers

Right around now, begonia tubers are available at home and garden centers,usually in packages of three tubers that look like this.

Healthy tubers
Packages of begonia tubers

Starting out with healthy tubers is very important. While at the garden center, I try to examine the tubers in the package as best I can. I look past the wood chips to determine if the tubers are healthy. I look for plump, firm tubers. If a tuber feels mushy when squeezed, that means it’s starting to rot. I also look for any sign of emerging stems on the concave side of the tuber.

Starting begonias in a greenhouse
Healthy tubers

They usually appear at first as tiny red or pink bumps and then they start to bud out. So in this case, red or pink bumps are a good thing as this means the tuber is viable.

 

 

  •  Starting the Tubers in the Greenhouse

I planted the tubers in square 5-inch plastic pots that drain. I used a 50/50 blend of seedling starter mix and regular potting soil and moistened it slightly before filling the containers.

I filled each container with soil until it was about two to three inches short of the top and then placed the tuber in the middle with the root side down and the side with the emerging stems (pink bumps) up. I pushed the tuber down into the soil but didn’t completely submerge it.

Starting begonias in a greenhouse
Pink/red stems facing up
Starting begonias in a greenhouse
Planted

Then I covered the tubers with a dusting of soil. I watered around (but not on top of) the tuber to moisten the soil. During the tuber’s time in the greenhouse, it’s important to keep the soil moist but not soggy. And since tubers can rot fairly easily, it’s also important not to have standing water on top of the tuber. So in short, water around it, not on top of it. In addition to evenly moist soil, they need lots of bright light, so my grow light will also come in handy.
Once the stems sprout a bit, I will fill more soil in on top of the tuber so that the roots can better develop. Another option at this point is to replant the tuber deeper into the soil.

 

  • Going Outside

When the danger of frost has passed and evening temperatures stay above 50⁰F, I can replant the begonias into containers or hanging baskets and place them outside in partial shade. They should be kept evenly moist (but not soggy) throughout the summer and fertilized occasionally. I’m looking forward to the show.

Starting begonias in a greenhouse
About our guest writer:  Heidi lives in the Seattle area with her husband, Chris. In the fall of 2014, they became the proud owners of their own Sunglo greenhouse. Read about their experiences with their greenhouse and their other home and garden projects on Heidi’s blog, My Sweet Cottage.

If you have a Sunglo greenhouse and would like to share your experiences, submit an article to info@sunglogreenhouses.com. From greenhouse gardening to replacing a panel on your greenhouse etc. – 4 paragraph minimum. Please include pictures.

Lean-to greenhouse review

Lean-To Greenhouse Review – Minnesota

A dear customer of ours in MN. sent us a wonderful story about his greenhouse experience. If you are interested in building a lean-to greenhouse this is a must read!

“The knee wall is 4X6 pressure treated lumber.  It is a higher level of treatment from a local high quality lumber yard, not your standard self service do it yourself store.
Sunglo 1700 Lean-to greenhouse review
1700D – 8×12.5 Lean-to greenhouse – Foundation completed
I started the foundation wall right after I placed the order with Sunglo and took my time getting a good base packed below the timbers.  I dug out the black dirt down 12 inches and put in 8 inches of gravel, packing it as I went and kept it level.  When I put the timbers on top of the gravel it took lots of adjusting to get it level and square.  I measured kitty corner both directions many times. Then let it sit a few days and did some more adjusting after it rained and settled the ground some more.  I used a 2 foot level first and after I thought I had it right I borrowed a transom to make sure, and it was nice and level.  If I had to do it over again, I would get a transom before I started.  It would have saved me some time.
Sunglo 1700 Lean-to greenhouse review
1700D – 8×12.5 Lean-to greenhouse – First steps in the assembly process
Mounting the vertices upright and ridge header on the steel pole building wall was a challenge.
I waited for the greenhouse to arrive to prep the building to make sure I cut the steel in the correct place.   I knew I had to cut the corrugated steel to mount the greenhouse to the building wood frame.
I used a hand held high speed grinder with a cutting disk to slot out the steel siding about 3 inches wide. I inverted J trim on each side of the uprights and under the ridge header to finish the look. I put flashing on the top side of the ridge header. I also installed additional 2X4 framing above and below the ridge header to reattach the steel siding on each side of the slot.
Sunglo 1700 Lean-to greenhouse review
1700D – 8×12.5 Lean-to greenhouse – Assembly process progressing
My largest mistake was to assume my building was plumb. It was only 6 years old and I was very pleased with the quality so I assumed it was plumb. I found out differently when I tried to install the first overhead truss.  It didn’t reach!  When I checked the building I found it was leaning away by 3/4 inch from the top to bottom of the greenhouse. This delayed me a day removing the vertices uprights and ridge header to shim it plumb and reinstalling things.
It took me awhile to assemble the greenhouse because I’m not good at puzzles, so I went slow. I had planned to do so up front.
Sunglo 1700 Lean-to greenhouse review
1700D – 8×12.5 Lean-to greenhouse – Assembly complete!
I only worked half days because it was August on the south side of a steel building and it was hot!  I made a few mistakes but it was easy to drill out the rivets and correct them.
I was mostly done after a week and I was able to do it all by myself, except for mounting the ridge header and the first gable end panel.  My wife held things in place until I secured it.
During the assembly process I appreciated Sunglo’s customer service in discussing and solving the challenges I encountered. I am now enjoying learning how to grow plants in a greenhouse. I have lettuce, spinach, radish, chives, tomatoes, onions and strawberries already growing.”
Sunglo 1700 Lean-to greenhouse review - Interior
Growing strawberries, flowers, tomatoes etc.
Sunglo 1700 Lean-to greenhouse review - Interior
Yellow buckets filled with water help heat the greenhouse
Sunglo 1700 Lean-to greenhouse review - Interior
With multiple layers of shelving and lots of hanging posts you can really use maximum space for growing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lean-to greenhouses are wonderful for limited or confined space. Sunglo offers 2 sizes of lean-to style greenhouses. The 1700 series – 8ft width is shown above and we also carry a 1500 series – 5ft width for even smaller spaces. With lengths from 5′ to 100′ we can help you find the right size for your space. To read another lean-to greenhouse review – click here.

Sunglo Greenhouse Sales and Promos

GREENHOUSE SALE!!


 Sunglo offers package discounts! If you are interested in a Sunglo and would like a free quote with our package discount give us a call at 425-251-8005 M-F 8-4 PST or e-mail us at Info@sunglogreenhouses.com with your request!

 Get the greenhouse of your dreams for a fraction of the cost!

See our models below and click on the “series links” for more information.

2100G greenhouse sale usa
2100 Series shown with double doors and concrete knee wall

 

 

1200G greenhouse sale USA
1200 Series shown with double doors and cedar benches
1000C greenhouse sale usa
1000 Series shown with a knee wall
1500B greenhouse sale USA
1500 Lean-to series

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visit Sunglo on Facebook to see customer projects, pictures, reviews and more!

1700D greenhouse sale usa
1700 Lean-to series shown with a knee wall
Introduction to hydroponics

Introduction to Hydroponics

 Alternative gardening techniques have recently taken off in the garden industry and for good reason. Aquaponics and hydroponics have become extremely popular and are a fun new way to provide food for you and your family. Not only are these techniques efficient but they are pretty low maintenance. This post is meant to teach you how hydroponic systems work, provide pros and cons and give some examples of a few systems that are on the market today. I’ll be covering aquaponics in the next month as well. I hope you enjoy 🙂

“Hydroponics is a subset of hydroculture and is a method of growing plants using mineral nutrient solutions, in water, without soil. Terrestrial plants may be grown with their roots in the mineral nutrient solution only or in an inert medium, such as perlite or gravel.  It was introduced in the 1920s as a means of commercial plant production.

Hydroponic growing may not be for everyone. There are a variety of systems available today so do your research when deciding on a system. Most gardeners use hydro systems indoors like in a greenhouse or even in a garage/shed. But smaller systems can be placed outside. Some hydro systems come as complete kits and are designed for only a few plants or hundreds. There are many kits you can purchase and lots of DIY ideas.

The video below shows how to make your own small DIY hydro system.

With in-expensive materials and an overall small system, DIY is a great way for trial and error.

Introduction to hydroponicsIf you prefer to purchase your first hydro system I recommend something like this Garden-Of-Ease complete hydroponic system – Pictured on left. This system runs about $60. It’s smart to start slowly and with only a few plants so you don’t overwhelm yourself. Once you have the hang of it you can move to a more generous amount of plants.

Introduction to hydroponicsAnother great small system to start with is the Current Culture Solo6 system. Unlike the system above this one has 6 holes and a sleeker look. The housing is durable and all-around a much better quality than the lesser version above. It is a bit more expensive ranging around $400 but you can expand the system by attaching more modules of the same brand. It’s pretty cool! Contact us if you are interested in Current Culture products.

Once you feel comfortable with the smaller system research some larger ones. If you have a greenhouse or a specified area for growing measure the space so you can accurately find the right size hydro system to fill the growing area.

Introduction to hydroponicsSunglo carries Current culture products. They offer a good variety of sizes and are great for tomatoes, peppers, lettuce, etc., etc. Pictured on left – A Sunglo owner purchased the mid size Current Culture UC4XXL13 system to start in his 15×20 – 2100G model. This system has 4 large modules that nicely accommodate larger plants. The model #UC4XXL13 gives away a few things. The tells how many plant modules are included and the 13 tells how many gallons each module holds. Under Current hydro kits are complete systems including Introduction to hydroponics all of the PVC piping/tubing and a high quality air pump. And a year warranty gives you peace of mind. There are endless  possibilities of what you can grow but this customer chose to start with tomatoes. I myself would choose tomatoes as well! What kind of food would you grow? It’s a hard question to answer! As you can see from the pictures hydroponic growing has it’s upsides! The foliage is a rich green, abundant and lush. Compared to my tomato plant (pictured below right) that I grew almost exactly the same time as his. Introduction to hydroponicsThe difference in height is vast and his foliage puts mine to shame! The Current Culture UC4XXL13 system runs about $1000. Now think about how much food you could grow with that! You Introduction to hydroponicscould make your money back in food in a few short years. It is wise to do research not only on systems but on the plants you want to grow; what kind of nutrients they will Introduction to hydroponicsneed, how much light and even the germination time. Sunglo can help with a lot of these things. We offer full packages that include a greenhouse and the perfect size hydro system to fit. We also carry lighting and controls for your greenhouse. The full line of Current Culture nutrients is available as well. So look no further! We’ve got you covered! Garden stores that carry hydro products usually carry matching nutrients made by the same brand. Like how we carry Current Culture hydro systems and nutrient products.  Besides buying the starts or seeds there is really no other cost – These medium systems range only 50-100 watts.

Every decision we make in life has its pros and cons. So here are a few things to consider when deciding on your alternative gardening method:

PROS:

  • Weeds can’t grow
  • Most plant diseases are eliminated
  • Pests are less of a concern so pesticide usage goes down as well
  • Hydroponically grown food has been known to be more nutritional and taste better
  • Less water waste
  • Nutrients are more controlled therefore plants are more abundant & lush
  • Plants grow faster and have bigger yields
  • Plants can be placed closer together so less space is used comparatively to soil gardening

CONS:

  • There are limited varieties of plants that can be hydroponically grown
  • Setup and system costs can be very expensive
  • Hydroponics requires more technical knowledge and training than soil cultivation
  • If the watering system fails, plants will dry out and die rapidly

Current Culture has a great YouTube channel that features how-to and informational videos that are very useful. The video below shows how the Current Culture System is assembled.

 1 Current Culture UC6 System (pictured below on right) would fit great into a 10×10 – Sunglo Introduction to hydroponics1200C model (pictured on left) with room for a Introduction to hydroponicswater reservoir and a few potted or hanging plants. The current culture system and the Sunglo greenhouse can both expand. So once you have mastered hydroponic growing and you want to add to your plant collection you are able to extend your Sunglo greenhouse and purchase more modules to advance your hydro system. There are no limits!

Please call or e-mail Sunglo at 800-647-0606 or info@sunglogreenhouses.com for more information on Current Culture products or to receive a free hydro greenhouse estimate!

greenhouse gardening basics

Greenhouse Gardening Basics

Greenhouse Gardening – The Basics

A few basic items that we recommend you start off with and some words of encouragement!

 

The time has finally come. After all the hours of researching, sifting through greenhouse blogs and forums, having those off and on feelings about making the decision and debating whether or not you have the time and energy to even use one; You have purchased your own greenhouse! And frankly it should be one of the best decisions you made! Greenhouse’s not only give you a space to grow and overwinter plants but the enrichment gardening brings to people’s lives is incredible. And let’s not down play the fact that you will save a few bucks too! But once you have made it through the pain and hectic-ness of finding your perfect greenhouse, building the foundation, greenhouse assembly and the spendy electrician… where do you start? Greenhouse gardening is not as scary as it looks. The greenhouse itself will do a lot of the work for you. Light, air circulation, heat and controls are provided for you. Sunglo’s packages include lighting, ventilation system (for air circulation), heater, controls, etc. – To make life easier on you. Once these have been electrically hooked up you can focus on the fun stuff!

I am a beginner gardener myself and I started off with a small lean-to greenhouse but had no idea where to start! Luckily I had some help and now can say I have an ity bity tiny amount of experience under my belt!

If you own a Sunglo greenhouse you should either have the built in benches and shelves or purchased your own bench system. Obviously this design depends on the type of plants and amount of plants you intend to grow. But adequate space for pots and thingy majigs will make life easier.

 

Here is a list of items I suggest you purchase to start off-

  1. A large bag of soil – Go with a brand that will feed the plants for 90+ days and is suitable for indoor/outdoor gardening. (If you have good compost in your garden already, a special fine seed starter soil without the nutrients might be best.)

 

  1. Seeds! – Choose 3-5 packets to start with and make sure they are appropriate for the season. I would suggest some flowers and tomatoes. Also, read the back of the packet. Seed packets have a great deal of info on the back and the difference between needing full sun and partial shade etc. may sway your decisions.

 

  1. Plants – You want your greenhouse to feel like a garden, so choose a few pretty, green, grown plants to stick in the corners or pull them from the plants you already own. I like cacti and succulents. They are easy to care for and look great! Don’t forget to grab a few pretty pots to transfer them into. The book “The Greenhouse Expert” by Dr. D.G. Hessayon is very useful and provides detailed information on greenhouse plants. I would pick up this book immediately!

 

  1. Little things – Grab a few seed trays (You know the black trays with 50+ squares), you’ll want a small and a large water can, a few 5 gallon buckets for plant scraps, a small circulation fan (unless you have one from Sunglo already), work gloves (get 2 pairs JIC!), hand trowel (small garden shovel), and take a look through all the goodies in your local nursery or garden store. There are always fun things you can pick up!

 

It really depends on the plants you will be growing to determine what kinds of accessories you will want. Eventually you might want to upgrade your atmospheric controls or install some extra shelving. Greenhouses are so fun and customizable. Follow your heart! And remember you can always change things around. Nothing is permanent.

 

The main things to remember are light, temperature and water. As long as you give your plants adequate light, keep the desired temperature and water your plants to their specific needs you should have no problems! – OK you might run into a few along the way! I won’t lie to you! But those things are for later on. Enjoy your greenhouse! Experiment with different plants and flowers. Find your passion and relax in your own paradise! That is what a greenhouse is all about. Fulfilling your passion and creating your own oasis.

 

Need help? You can always contact us at Sunglo for any questions about your greenhouse or growing. And Visit us on Facebook to see what other customers have done to their greenhouses and what they have growing!

2100 Series (15’3″ Width) Sunglo DIY Greenhouse

 

NEW Greenhouse Accessories!

Sunglo would like to introduce 2 NEW greenhouse accessories…

 

NEW 30×12 Cedar Shelving-

Cedar benches & shelves - Sunglo greenhouse brand
Cedar benches – 30″ x 30″ and NEW cedar shelving – 30″ x 12″
sunglo accessories and parts
Cedar benches – 30″ x 30″ and NEW cedar shelves – 30″ x 12″

 

AND

 

NEW Univent Automatic Vent Openers-

greenhouse accessories
Univent Automatic vent opener
greenhouse accessories
Univent automatic vent opener installed

 

To see Sunglo’s full product catalog e-mail us at info@sunglogreenhouses.com with your request for a free catalog. Or give us a call at 800-647-0606 for any questions.

Please visit our Facebook page for customer projects and frequently updated pictures.

 

 

 

Greenhouse Growing – Air Plants (Tillandsia)

Air plants (Tillandsia)

Campbell12

Air plants have taken off recently and it is no wonder. They are magnificent plants and require little care for beautiful results. Take your pick of 600 varities of air plant! Air plant is actually just the nickname for the real name which is Tillandsia. Tillandsia varieties are native to Central and South American deserts, forests and mountains. The thinner-leafed varieties grow in rainy areas and the thick-leafed varieties in areas more subject to drought. Tillandsia species are epiphytes, meaning they normally grow without soil while attached to other plants. A lot like

Tillandsia and pup
Air Plant with pup – Wikipedia

orchids. They are not parasitic and receive moisture and nutrients from the air (dust, decaying leaves and insect matter) through hair like structures on the leaves called trichomes. A big difference between air plants and orchids is they require very little care. They love bright, indirect sunlight and a warm moist environment. They can tolerate temperatures as low as 50F to about 90F. Air plants are amazing because reproduction is by offsets called “pups” pictured above. A single plant could have up to a dozen pups. The pups grow off of the “mother” plant until it is large enough to separate and become its own plant.

Tillandsia
Lynda’s design – Hanging terrarium

Thanks to our customer Lynda C. I have come to love these whimsical plants and learn that they grow wonderfully in our greenhouses. Lynda discovered tillandsias and fell in love! This love prompted her to purchase a greenhouse and open up shop to sell the plants she adores. Air plants make beautiful and surprising gifts and are sold as decorations. Lynda designs a variety of terrariums, hangers, zen gardens and holders from different mixed media to highlight their beauty and uniqueness. They are truly beautiful pieces of art. To visit her website Random Oddities click here and see all of her passion filled designs. You can also visit Lynda and purchase items if you live in the Ann Arbor, MI. area. Her air plant decorations are on sale at Town Peddler in Livonia.

Sunglo lean-to greenhouse
Lynda’s 5 x 15 lean-to sunglo greenhouse with shade cloth in use

Lynda grows her air plants in her lean-to Sunglo greenhouse pictured to the right. She says they grow wonderfully in the greenhouse and can easily control the temperature for maximum growth. Lynda and her husband customized their greenhouse by building an extended wooden foundation to give the extra room and height they desired. She now happily runs her

business with a supply of never ending air plants in her Sunglo greenhouse!

Tillandsia
Air plants growing on homemade mesh shelves in Lynda’s sunglo greenhouse

Lynda’s designs are great for any room of your house and come in all sizes. She has a great variety of air plants. For her full selection visit her gallery here. And like her on Facebook! See examples below.

Tillandsia veluntinaTillandsia ionantha peach

Tillandsia caput medusae

Tillandsia fuchsii v gracillis

Fabulous Orchids!

Fabulous Orchids!

Orchids

Orchids are mysterious, breath taking and high maintenance. Grown by enthusiasts for their elegance and beauty, as well as for decoration. The most common type of orchid is probably the moth orchid, or the Phalaenopsis orchid. These orchids can be bought at most garden stores and are the easiest to take care of because they do well in most indoor environments. But even the easiest to grow orchids require special care.

What are orchids?

Orchids belong to the Orchidaceae family. It is a diverse and widespread flowering plant with colorful blooms and is often fragrant. There are so many orchid species it’s impossible to know them all.  The number of orchid species is twice the number of bird species, and about four times the number of mammal species! Since the 19th century, horticulturists have produced more than 100,000 hybrids and cultivars. Orchids can be found anywhere around the world except in freezing climates. The majority of orchids are found in humid, hot, tropic/sub tropic regions. Orchids are perennial epiphytes which grow anchored to trees or shrubs.Orchids Species such as Angraecum sororium are lithophytes growing on rocks or very rocky soil. Other orchids (including the majority) are terrestrial and can be found in habitat areas such as grasslands or forest.

Orchids can be found in a rainbow of colors, shapes and sizes. I happen to prefer the brightly colored larger species. Many different orchid vendors can be found online offering some rare and sometimes strange looking species and hybrids.

Orchids

Can you grow orchids in a Sunglo?

Absolutely! Sunglo greenhouses are great for growing orchids due to the ability to manipulate the environment. You have a ventilation system for the summer months and heating for the winter. Orchids have many different preferred climates. Be sure to make yourself aware of the climate needs of each species. There are even climate controls available to help control humidity and moisture. Greenair products offer a wide variety of atmospheric controls and can be purchased through Sunglo.

Orchids

Tips on maintenance:

Growing orchids from seed is something I really don’t want to get into. It can take years and years for a “seed orchid” to mature and we just don’t have time for that! But when you purchase an orchid and bring it home here are a few things to remember:

  1. Study the species you want to bring home. Make sure you can provide the needed light, temperature and feeding instructions.
  2. Understand the watering requirements. With a vast number of species there are some differences in the watering procedures. Most do not need much water. Click here for more orchid care tips.
  3. Feed your orchid. Orchid fertilizer can be bought at most home and garden stores. A fertilizer with high nitrogen is usually suggested. It is recommended to feed most orchids 1-2 times per month.
  4. Repot when needed. You must research your orchid to know what kind of media it likes. Most garden stores carry mixed media packages for the common species. Repotting is important to give the orchid fresh media – moss, bark, peat etc. And also give more room if it needs it.
  5. Know the diseases that can occur. If you can identify the disease right off the bat you will have a greater chance of saving your precious flowers. Some common diseases are leaf spots, petal blight, and fungi such as black rot.

OrchidsMore valuable information can be found at the following links:

My first orchid

American Orchid Society

YouTube Video – Orchid care