Tagged: greenhouse information

Sunglo Greenhouse Sales and Promos

GREENHOUSE SALE!!


 Sunglo offers package discounts! If you are interested in a Sunglo and would like a free quote with our package discount give us a call at 425-251-8005 M-F 8-4 PST or e-mail us at Info@sunglogreenhouses.com with your request!

 Get the greenhouse of your dreams for a fraction of the cost!

See our models below and click on the “series links” for more information.

2100G greenhouse sale usa
2100 Series shown with double doors and concrete knee wall

 

 

1200G greenhouse sale USA
1200 Series shown with double doors and cedar benches
1000C greenhouse sale usa
1000 Series shown with a knee wall
1500B greenhouse sale USA
1500 Lean-to series

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visit Sunglo on Facebook to see customer projects, pictures, reviews and more!

1700D greenhouse sale usa
1700 Lean-to series shown with a knee wall

NWFGS 2015 – SUNGLO BOOTH

NWFGS 2015

2015 NWFGS – Come see us!

Sunglo Greenhouses will be attending the 2015 Northwest Flower & Garden Show! If you came to visit us last year you’re in for a pleasant surprise this year! We are re-designing our booth and bringing some hands on displays to really show how strong and wonderful our product is! Not only will you be able to touch and see a Sunglo assembled but we are offering some killer NWFGS promotions! The 1000C – 8×10 greenhouse will be displayed so you can actually see how the greenhouses are made and experience one first-hand!

Check out our NWFGS greenhouse special! Only for the month of February! Click here.


Here’s a look at our builders working hard on the 1000C demo model!

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Watch our 2015 NWFGS adventure on our Facebook page.


Sunglo greenhouses booth #701 is located on the 4th floor of the Seattle Convention Center on the other side of the breathtaking display gardens. We are on the corner of an isle so you can’t miss us!

NWFGS 2015 floor plan1

NWFGS Location

Need directions? Click the map on the left for directions to the convention center from the light rail, on foot, shuttle, etc.!

To see the entire NWFGS floor plan click here. And also visit the NWFGS website for a list of all the attending exhibitors and speakers.

We hope to see you there!

2014 Winter Photo Contest – Winners Announced!

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Contest Winners Announced

Sunglo’s 2014 winter photo contest was a success!

We really wanted to engage with our long time Sunglo owners and give our new greenhouse owners something to be excited about! ALL of the photo entries were beautiful and we had a lot of fun interacting with all of our contestants. Thank you for your entries and we hope you will all participate again next year!

 

After a long deliberation the Sunglo crew has chosen the winners:

**  Congratulations!  **

 

3rd Place: Ms. Sheisl-

To view the full photo album of this project click here.

Contest winners announced

 

2nd Place: Ms. Vanmeer-

To view the full photo album of this project click here.

Contest winners announced

 

  1st Place: Ms. Madden/Jacobson-

To view the full photo album of this project click here.

And visit her blog here.

Contest winners announced

 

We had a hard time choosing through these great photos! Here is a peek at some other entries –

2014 Winter Photo Entry
1700 Lean-to model. Learn more about lean-to greenhouses here.
2014 Winter Photo Entry
Happy Sunglo owners in their 1000 model. Learn more about the 1000 series here.
1200 Sunglo greenhouse
Beautiful 1200 model in AZ. Learn about the 1200 series here.
1700 Lean-to Sunglo greenhouse
Sunglo’s can hold a ton of snow! See details about this size lean-to greenhouse here.

 

 

 

Sunglo's 1000 model greenhouse
Beautiful Christmas bows on this 1000 series. Learn more here.

1500 Lean-To Series (5’1.5″ Width) Sunglo DIY Greenhouse

 

Early American Greenhouse History

GREENHOUSE HISTORY

 

 

We found in Google Books a scan of an interesting book from 1896, Greenhouse construction:  a complete manuaIllustration of the effect of greenhouse glass angles on sunglightl on the building, heating, ventilating and arrangement of greenhouses by Levi Rawson Taft, a professor of horticulture at Michigan Agricultural College.  Below is an excerpt from the book on greenhouse history.  While the information is dated, the book contains some interesting information and diagrams such as this illustration of the effect of glass at different angles.  From Chapter 1, Greenhouse Construction, History of Greenhouses:

It is known that the old Romans were able to secure fresh fruits and vegetables, for their banquets, the year round by both retarding and accelerating their growth. As an indication of their skill, it is said that they even forced the cucumber. They possessed no elaborate structures for this purpose, but grew them in pits covered with large slabs of talc. Heat was obtained from decomposing manure, and by means of hot air flues. They are believed to have had peach and grape houses, and it is claimed by some, that hot water in bronze pipes was used to warm them.

In modem times the structures have undergone a gradual development, from houses containing no glass whatever, to the forcing house of to-day which is nearly ninety-five per cent. of glass. The first house of which we have any record was built by Solomon de Caus, at Heidelberg, Germany, about 1619. It was used to shelter over four hundred orange trees planted in the ground, during the winter, and consisted of wooden shutters placed over a span roof framework, so as to form the walls and roof. It was warmed by means of four large furnaces, and ventilated by opening small shutters in the sides and roof. In the spring the framework was taken down. This structure, in size, compared well with the greenhouses of to-day as it was two hundred and eighty feet long and thirty-two feet wide. On account of the expense of putting up and taking down this framework, and of keeping it in repair, it was replaced by a structure of freestone. This had an opaque roof, and the openings in the sides were closed with shutters during the winter.

What’s great about reading through these older volumes is to see what has changed and what remains true about an efficient, functional greenhouse.  While they had no access to the modern materials such as the aluminum frames and insulated acrylic panels we use in our Sunglo Greenhouses, there is the same concern with durability, climate appropriateness, maximizing available sun and managing temperature.  We hope you have fun reading it!  And, if you decide not to build your own greenhouse out of wrought iron and glass, give us a call.