Tagged: winter greenhouse

2014 Winter Photo Contest – Winners Announced!

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Contest Winners Announced

Sunglo’s 2014 winter photo contest was a success!

We really wanted to engage with our long time Sunglo owners and give our new greenhouse owners something to be excited about! ALL of the photo entries were beautiful and we had a lot of fun interacting with all of our contestants. Thank you for your entries and we hope you will all participate again next year!

 

After a long deliberation the Sunglo crew has chosen the winners:

**  Congratulations!  **

 

3rd Place: Ms. Sheisl-

To view the full photo album of this project click here.

Contest winners announced

 

2nd Place: Ms. Vanmeer-

To view the full photo album of this project click here.

Contest winners announced

 

  1st Place: Ms. Madden/Jacobson-

To view the full photo album of this project click here.

And visit her blog here.

Contest winners announced

 

We had a hard time choosing through these great photos! Here is a peek at some other entries –

2014 Winter Photo Entry
1700 Lean-to model. Learn more about lean-to greenhouses here.
2014 Winter Photo Entry
Happy Sunglo owners in their 1000 model. Learn more about the 1000 series here.
1200 Sunglo greenhouse
Beautiful 1200 model in AZ. Learn about the 1200 series here.
1700 Lean-to Sunglo greenhouse
Sunglo’s can hold a ton of snow! See details about this size lean-to greenhouse here.

 

 

 

Sunglo's 1000 model greenhouse
Beautiful Christmas bows on this 1000 series. Learn more here.

1700 Lean-To Series (7’7.5″ Width) Sunglo DIY Greenhouse

 

1500 Lean-To Series (5’1.5″ Width) Sunglo DIY Greenhouse

 

2100 Series (15’3″ Width) Sunglo DIY Greenhouse

 

1200 Series (10’3″ Width) Sunglo DIY Greenhouse

 

1000 Series (7’9″ Width) Sunglo DIY Greenhouse

 

Greenhouse Foundations

greenhouse foundations
2100 model with 3 foot raised foundation/knee wall

 

Greenhouse foundations

Purchasing a greenhouse can be a difficult and sometimes overwhelming process. The first factors you should consider are location, foundation and of course your budget. All foundations should be level and square. A square and level foundation will eliminate challenges later when installing your greenhouse. A raised foundation or knee wall is a good option if you prefer to add height to your greenhouse. Knee walls are commonly 12-48 inches high and can be made of various materials. If you would like a knee wall with your Sunglo greenhouse kit please notify us at 800-647-0606 to add a door drop kit to your order.

Concrete

Concrete is a great option for a greenhouse foundation and often chosen among consumers because is it convenient. To attach your greenhouse to a concrete base we recommend attaching quality treated wood to the base of the greenhouse, commonly called a wood sill plate. 2 x 4’s will do. If you choose to use pressure treated wood make sure to install a barrier between the wood and aluminum, such as gasket material, as the treated wood can cause the aluminum to rust. Sunglo includes a barrier called a “boot” with each greenhouse kit.

greenhouse foundations
Concrete foundation – Raised/knee wall

Measure twice before cutting your wood to ensure proper dimensions. We suggest allowing a 1” border around the inside and outside of the entire greenhouse. Sunglo adds 2″ to each greenhouse size for the foundation measurements.

This is designed to allow a safe margin for irregularities in the wood sill plate. After the concrete has been poured and is level and square, a small drain should be placed in the center of the slab where water run off can drain into a gravel pit or piping that leads to a drainage area. Then your greenhouse can be bolted to the foundation.  Water and electricity should be ran to the greenhouse site before the foundation is built.

Wood

Inside a 1200G Sunglo greenhouse
1200 series Sunglo greenhouse with a raised wooden foundation and custom benches

Building a wood base is easy and inexpensive. Cedar and redwood are commonly used. Pressure treated wood is also a great option but make sure to put a barrier between the wood and aluminum, such as gasket material, as the treated wood can cause the aluminum to rust. The size of your base will depend on the size of your greenhouse again allowing a 1” border around the inside and outside of the greenhouse. After assembling the base and making sure your ground is level lay down a weed barrier. This allows the water to drain through but does not allow weeds to come up through the floor boards.

1000E Sunglo greenhouse
1000E Sunglo greenhouse built on a wooden foundation

Pack the natural earth over the excess barrier. After your base is finished and the weed barrier is set underneath, you need to cover it. Start laying down your wood planks to make the floor. Now it’s time to attach the greenhouse frame to the base – Make sure it is level and square again by measuring from corner to corner.  For added insulation, we suggest you caulk the bottom of the aluminum framing (caulk the wood then attach the frame – making sure there is a barrier between the aluminum and wood)  where it meets the base with a waterproof sealant – If you are using pressure treated it is still a good idea to caulk between the base and wood. This will add extra protection to the greenhouse and keep cold air from entering and warm air from escaping in the colder months. If you are using pressure treated wood make sure the aluminum does not come into direct contact. Sunglo includes a plastic “boot” that attaches to the base rails with all our kits, so you don’t have to worry! As with all foundations please consider whether you will need water and electricity ran to the greenhouse site. Wood foundations are natural and beautiful looking! The only down side is you might have to replace the wood every 8-10 years.

Deck

If you are planning on purchasing a lean-to style greenhouse or even a small free-standing but only have room on your deck, that’s no problem!  Before attaching the greenhouse base to pressure treated wood lay down a thick rubber, insulated mat that is the dimension of the floor of your greenhouse.

greenhouse foundations
1700 lean-to model on deck

There are various mats you can purchase that have designs or just plain old black. Insulating underneath and around the base is a good idea also. To attach the greenhouse base to the deck we recommend contacting your hardware store representative and explaining the project. Decks are made of different materials and you wouldn’t want to ruin your deck in the process. Now insulation will be an issue as well. Depending on your style of deck please take this into consideration and do your research on what type of insulation, if any, you should use. Water and electricity can be easily ran to a greenhouse on a deck foundation as it is usually attached to a house or a building.

There is lots of info on the web about different foundations and step by step instructions on how to build them. I hope this gave you an idea of what you want to do with your foundation!

NOTE: If you choose to create a foundation that is NOT concrete we highly recommend giving the wood base a few days to settle. After 24 hours re-measure for square and level. In some cases the foundation will settle and become uneven affecting the assembly of the greenhouse. And you dont want that to happen because it can make installation very difficult!

Sunglo offers a greenhouse foundations guide that shows how to build a easy, affordable and effective foundation base. To request a free-standing or lean-to foundation guide call us at 800-647-0606.

To view a large gallery of pictures visit our Facebook albums page.

 For more advice about greenhouse foundations or general questions leave a comment below or please e-mail us at info@sunglogreenhouses.com or call us at 1-800-647-0606.

Energy saving tips – In your greenhouse

Here are a few energy saving tips:

Energy Saving Tips

Reduce air leakage from the greenhouse –

Small cracks and loose glazing materials can cause unwanted air to enter or escape from your greenhouse. Obviously both will affect the efficiency of any heating system you have in place. But fixing areas around the doors and vents that are not air tight can help stop unwanted air flow. Caulking holes or lining parts of the frame and weather stripping around the door can make a big difference. Shutting your fans off during the winter and covering them with a thick plastic will help keep your greenhouse regulated in the winter months. And always fix any holes or broken panels as soon as possible. If you have a Sunglo you can call 1-800-647-0606 for any replacement parts!

Use a double layer glazing system –

Double layered glazing material can be beneficial, if it is done the correct way. Our greenhouses have an inner corrugated panel that creates a 1.5” dead air space keeping it exceptionally insulated. To see how Sunglo’s unique glazing system works click here.

Install windbreaks –

Windbreaks are important in high wind areas because it prevents the cold wind from hitting the greenhouse therefore cooling it down. Building a mini fence or even planting shrubbery around the base of your greenhouse is effective. Some gardener’s plant small trees around their greenhouse, it not only looks pretty but will help keep the wind at bay. Whatever you decide to use make sure it stands mid-level to your greenhouse so it doesn’t block the sun. If you already have some tree cover in your yard or near the greenhouse than your in luck! No planting for you!

Use a shade cloth –

Shade cloths are wonderful for high temperature areas. They are used during the hottest time of the day to reduce thermal solar radiation. Sunglo carries a wide variety of sizes and they can be mixed and matched to perfectly fit your greenhouse. For more information on shade cloths click here.

Use your heat wisely –

To calculate what type of heater you’ll need for your greenhouse there is a simple formula. Take the temperature you want the greenhouse to stay at (let’s say 50) and the average winter temperature in your area (how about 20) and subtract them (equals 30). Next you multiply the temperature difference by the surface area of your greenhouse (8×10 greenhouse is 276 X 30 = 8280). Now you multiply your answer by your greenhouse materials U value. For a Sunglo you would multiply 8280 X .75 = 6210 BTU’s(.75 is Sunglo’s U value). This means you need to find a heater that has exactly or over 6210 BTU’s to efficiently heat your greenhouse. Using the correct heater will ensure thriving plants and not use unwanted electricity. To see this formula again and more in depth information on BTU requirements check out this post. Click here.

For more information on saving energy visit PSE.com

Sunglo greenhouse

Greenhouse Light Transmission

Greenhouse Light Transmission: Acrylic vs. Polycarbonate

sunglo greenhouseThe first part of our Blast from the Past video series is available today.

sunglo greenhouseThis week features a video comparing the light transmission of our acrylic glazing material to polycarbonate.

Click here to watch the video on Youtube.

Though the videos date themselves, the tests conducted in them are perhaps more relevant today than when they were originally filmed.

Our dual pane Therma-Truss® construction uses UV stabilized; impact resistant DR acrylic which resists discoloration and deterioration for up to 20 years. It incorporates a smooth outer layer and corrugated inner layer as shown in the diagram at right. Light is diffused evenly throughout the greenhouse by the corrugations while still allowing 92% of solar radiation to pass through.

This design is what started it all 35 years ago, and is what truly sets a Sunglo apart from all the rest today. In an industry overrun with flimsy, snap together polycarbonate greenhouses, you can take solace in knowing that somebody still considers American made quality to be more important than outsourcing overseas to improve the bottom line.

Seattle Tacoma Conservatories

People in the northwest love greenhouses. I see our greenhouses everywhere I go, and here in the northwest it is almost daily. When driving around on a dreary winter day it warms my heart to see one of our greenhouses all full of light and warmth. They are like little tropical islands in a sea of cold fog, but if you are not yet fortunate enough to have your own there are two conservatories here in the Seattle – Tacoma area that provide a tropical getaway for everyone.

w w seymour conservatoryThe Volunteer Park Conservatory in Seattle is celebrating their 100 year anniversary and their holiday display should not be missed. The link below will take you to their website which has all the information you need to plan your visit.

Volunteer Park Conservatory

volunteer park conservatoryThe W. W. Seymour Conservatory in Tacoma creates an entire Victorian holiday experience every year complete with costumes, story time, and visits from Santa. Their website can be viewed by following the link below.

W. W. Seymour Conservatory

We are very fortunate to have two of the three remaining Victorian-era conservatories in the U.S. right in our backyard and the holidays truly are a magical time to pay them a visit.